The REO Guide: 10 Steps to Buying a Bank-Owned Home

Many potential homebuyers and investors overlook bank-owned properties, but for buyers who take the time to understand the REO process, these homes can be a significant opportunity.

Some homebuyers are intimidated by foreclosed and bank-owned homes because they often require more renovations — and a different type of negotiation — than other options on the market. However, some REO properties come at a significant discount, and, if you’re willing to work through some of the nuances of the post-foreclosure market, you can set yourself up for a great deal.

What is a Real Estate Owned (REO) Property?

REO, which stands for “Real Estate Owned,” is a term applied to foreclosed properties whose ownership has transferred to the bank or lender.

In order to become an REO property, it must go through these general steps:

  1. Loan Default. The homeowner/borrower defaults on (fails to make) their mortgage payments for a certain length of time, with the qualifying amount usually specified in the mortgage terms.
  2. Foreclosure. The lender initiates legal proceedings against the borrower to foreclose on the property.
  3. Auction. The property is then offered to the public at a foreclosure auction and typically sold to the highest bidder. If the property sells to a third party at the auction, the bank or lender recoups some of the cost of the outstanding loan balance, interest and fees from the sale of the property.
  4. REO Status. If the home fails to sell at auction to a third party, possession typically passes to the lender and it becomes a Real Estate Owned (REO) property. The lender prepares to sell it, which may involve evicting occupants and removing outstanding liens attached to the property.

REO properties are attractive to homebuyers or real estate investors for several reasons. In many cases, lenders are motivated sellers who do not want to sit on their REO inventory, and (depending on the bank’s history with the property) these homes may be priced at a discount. However, other factors — like the home being sold “as is” — may affect the ultimate price, so it’s important to work through the process methodically to make sure you account for every variable.

10 Steps to Buying REO Properties

The process for buying an REO home is similar to the standard home buying process, but there are a few key exceptions to keep in mind. Whether you’re buying the home to live in or as an investment, these 10 steps should help set you up for success with bank-owned properties.

Step 1: Browse Available REO Properties

Before you get too far into the process, take a look at the properties available in your target market or price range. There are several ways for prospective homebuyers to browse available REO properties:

  • Bank and lender listings: Lender-specific listings, such as PennyMac REO listings, show all available bank-owned properties from a certain lender.
  • Multiple Listing Service: Lenders and Realtors® often use the Multiple Listing Service to list REO properties, making it easy to find options from multiple lenders in one place.
  • Real estate agent: A real estate agent will be able to find REO offerings from multiple lenders in your desired area.
  • Online services: Other online services, such as Zillow, offer tools to look up foreclosures by certain characteristics or in certain areas. Some of these tools are free to use, while others may charge a fee.

Step 2: Find a Lender and Discuss REO Financing

Once you’ve found a property you are interested in, talk to a lender about your financing options. This is particularly important because of the timing of the REO homebuying process; lenders are motivated to sell and want to get these homes off of their books, so the more prepared you are with financing, the better.

One thing that can speed up the REO homebuying process is getting pre-approved by the lender that owns the home. With this pre-approval, the lender that owns the REO property will know that you are financially qualified to purchase the property, making them more likely to accept your offer.

Step 3: Find a Real Estate Buyer’s Agent Who Knows REO Homes

A buyer’s agent is a great partner to have while you navigate the home buying process. Your buyer’s agent helps make sure you are finding the best properties at the best possible prices, and they will use their experience to guide you through every stage of the process. Your agent should also be able to tell you if you need to hire anyone else, such as an attorney or an inspection service, depending on your state and situation.

If you are specifically interested in REO properties, try to find a buyer’s agent who works with REO properties frequently. This way, your real estate agent knows the ins and outs of negotiating with a lender, how to calculate the cost of necessary repairs, how to work within the lender’s timeline and how to prepare you for what comes next.

Step 4: Refine Your List of Lender-Owned Properties

Once you are working with a buyer’s agent, you can start narrowing down your list of REO properties. Some major characteristics that should be taken into account include the following:

  • Listing price
  • Significant repairs needed (and the overall impact on price)
  • Location (and proximity to a school, workplace, or other desired area)
  • Number of bedrooms and bathrooms
  • Quality of neighborhood and surrounding areas
  • Community resources in the area, such as parks, gyms, places of worship, etc.
  • Lender-specific contingencies or requirements

Once you have taken your “must have” features into account, if you are left with multiple properties, refine your list based on “nice to have“ features like a large yard, a finished basement or an in-ground pool. Share your favorite homes with your agent, who can set up tours for properties at the top of your list.

Step 5: Get an Appraisal on Your Ideal Property

Some REO homes go for a great price, but buying a bank-owned home is not an automatic bargain. An REO property may be discounted based on an undesirable location or severe damage, or it can be overpriced based on comparable sales in the area or the lender’s desire to recoup the money spent. Either way, it’s a good idea to consider getting an appraisal so you know how the true value compares to the asking price.

An appraisal will help you get an objective estimated value, which you can compare to the bank’s asking price to see if the price is fair. During the appraisal, a licensed appraiser will take inventory of major systems (i.e., HVAC, plumbing), the structural integrity of the home, and check the prices of comparable homes in the area.

Note: An appraisal, which tries to estimate true home value, is different from a home inspection, which tries to take inventory of current and potential issues. An appraisal will help you decide whether or not the asking price is fair; an inspection will help you understand the repairs and renovations needed, which is critical for a bank-owned home.

Step 6: Make an Offer

Once you’ve found a property that is right for you, it’s time to make an offer.

Your agent will help you decide what kind of offer is likely to be accepted, put together the offer and submit it to the lender. Depending on the lender, you may need to submit special contract forms or paperwork. It is also common to attach an earnest money deposit check to your offer. This check (commonly 1-2% of the purchase price) is usually held in an escrow account until the purchase is finalized.

Make sure to consider the inspection process as you are making your offer. You may choose to make the offer contingent on inspection so you are protected if the inspection uncovers significant (and potentially dangerous) issues. If necessary repairs are well-documented, you can use that documentation to make your case for a low offer. Talk to your agent to understand your options when it comes to inspection contingencies.

Step 7: Have the Property Inspected

An inspection should be part of buying any home, but it is crucial for bank-owned homes. Real estate owned properties are typically sold “as is,” meaning the homebuyer is on the hook for any repairs — including major structural issues — that need to be fixed. An REO home may have been vacant for weeks or months, it may be neglected due to the homeowner’s financial trouble, or the previous owners may have removed items or damaged the property before vacating. Additionally, it’s possible that the property has gone through non-permitted renovations.

With that in mind, you need to be 100% sure you know what needs to be fixed before finalizing the loan. Having a home inspection done is the best way to take a thorough inventory of what repairs need to be made. The cost of these repairs should be added to the asking price so you have a better idea of what the home will cost you (and whether it’s still a good deal after repair costs are factored in).

In some cases, the lender may conduct an inspection when the home becomes bank-owned. If so, make sure you get a copy of the inspection report and review it thoroughly to decide if it is comprehensive enough to help make your decision.

Step 8: Negotiate Details

For better or worse, negotiating with a lender for a bank-owned home is different from negotiating with a homeowner.

On one hand, dealing with a bank instead of a homeowner means you don’t have to worry about emotional attachments to the home influencing the decision. You are also usually dealing with a very motivated lender who wants to get rid of the property (especially if it’s been on the market more than 30 days).

On the other hand, banks typically take longer to respond to an offer (or a question) than a homeowner because the offer must be reviewed by several individuals or companies. When the lender does respond, they will expect you to respond quickly to keep the process moving.

Working with a lender also means jumping through more corporate hoops. Banks are also more likely to present a counter offer because they must demonstrate they tried to get the best possible price for the property. In addition, the lender may ask you to sign a purchase addendum (which you should thoroughly review with your real estate agent or lawyer) and your final offer may be contingent on corporate approval.

Step 9: Finalize Your Loan

Now that you have submitted an offer, several things will be going on at once: the home inspection, negotiations with the bank, and the finalizing of your loan. During this time, you will be filling out paperwork and sharing information with your lender to ensure your loan is the right fit for the offer you have submitted.

Now is also the time to verify the status of the title. The bank typically clears the title before selling a bank-owned home but you can never assume this is the case. Contact the lender to see if the title has been cleared. If not, the lender may have a title company standing by to perform these services. If you are expected to do so yourself, hire a title company to run a full, insured title search before closing the deal.

Step 10: Closing

Once all of the paperwork is in place, you’ve wired in your down payment and your loan funds are in place, it’s time to close.

Closing on an REO property is similar to any other closing, with a few notable exceptions. If you’re unable to close by a predetermined closing date, the lender may charge a penalty for each day beyond the deadline. (You can try to avoid these delays by getting pre-approved for a loan and getting assurance that your financing will come through by a given date.)

At the closing, you and the lender representative will sign the documents necessary to transfer the house into your name and to finish your mortgage. After you’ve signed everything and the money goes to the right place, you’ll get the keys and a new title: homeowner.

Is an REO Home the Right Fit For You?

A bank-owned home can be a great opportunity for homebuyers or investors to find a good deal — but only if you’re willing to be patient and thorough. Dealing with a lender rather than an individual seller may mean slower response times and a more difficult negotiation, but it can lead to a potentially lower price from a motivated seller that has already handled outstanding taxes.

Browse PennyMac REO listings to see available bank-owned properties from PennyMac, or call a PennyMac Loan Officer to discuss your options today.

Source: pennymacusa.com

Mortgage Correspondent Lending and Loan Production

The intent of the following article is to provide an overview of mortgage industry correspondent lending, the resulting mortgage loan production and demonstrate one of the methods that investors use to track and report loan production numbers for risk management and seller performance monitoring purposes.

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In an effort to offer more loan products and remain competitive in today’s expanded marketplace both the bank and mortgage brokers participate in correspondent or wholesale lending programs. Correspondent and wholesale lenders refer to the banks and mortgage brokers that sell them loans by many names – Originators, Brokers, Lenders, Sellers or Correspondents. For the purpose of this article the banks and mortgage companies that originate the loans are “Sellers” and the correspondent or wholesale lenders that fund or buy the loan from the seller are “Investors”. Sellers, based on investors’ guidelines, make a lending decision and fund the mortgage loan using their own money, the investor’s money or a warehouse line of credit. As soon as the loan has closed, it is sold to an investor at a previously negotiated price. This dynamic works great for the borrower. The borrower is dealing with the seller who will close the loan, and the seller is able to shop the mortgage around thereby obtaining the borrower a lower interest rate.

Investors count the loans that they purchase from sellers as production. Investors typically report production numbers for a seller by loan program. A loan program can have many loan products that fall underneath its umbrella. For example, the investor may have a loan program type of “Conforming Fixed” and underneath the “Conforming Fixed” program umbrella the investor may offer 10-Year, 15-Year, 20-Year, 25-Year and 30-Year “Conforming Fixed” products.

The “Reporting Seller Mortgage Loan Production” section of this article details steps for creating a report that an investor may use to track and report seller production by loan program type. A disproportionate percentage of loan production for a single loan program type from a seller could represent a significant risk to the investor. The Sample Mortgage Loan Production Report in this article can be used as a model for stand alone report or incorporated into a comprehensive Seller Scorecard report.

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Source: lendingrisk.com

Former Dollar General CEO’s 45,000-Square-Foot Mansion Is Built for Entertainment

A megamansion that Dollar General built possesses everything a family would need for a retreat.

Owned by Cal Turner, Jr., the former CEO and chairman of Dollar General, the home on Evans Ridge Road in Parker, CO, is on the market for $12.9 million.

“It is a very unique property, and certainly one of the larger homes in the country,” says the listing agent, Liza Hogan.

The family built the 45,000-square-foot house in 2001 as a retreat, and it’s in pristine condition two decades later.

“It has never been used as a primary home, so it’s in beautiful condition,” added Hogan.

The mansion occupies 35 acres of land about 45 minutes from Denver. An adjacent 35-acre parcel is also up for sale, offering the potential for 70 acres of fenced-in privacy.

“The location is fantastic. You have beautiful, panoramic views of the Rocky Mountains,” Hogan says.

It’s approached by a long driveway that dramatically circles up to the house.

“When you come through the main gate, you can’t see anything of the property,” she adds.

Exterior of mansion in Parker, CO
Exterior of mansion in Parker, CO

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Entry
Entry

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Living space
Living space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Entertaining space
Entertaining space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Bowling alley
Bowling alley

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Bar
Bar

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Theater
Theater

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Pool
Pool

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Conceived as an ideal spot for a family getaway or corporate retreat, the massive house was built with fun and entertainment in mind.

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Watch: Frank Lloyd Wright Home Is a Rare Find in Indiana

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“It’s got a complete entertainment wing, with everything from a heated pool that looks like it was designed for a Roman emperor, Jacuzzi, steam room, and sauna room,” Hogan explains. “There’s also a home theater, a dance floor with a stage, a bowling alley, a billiard table, a pingpong table, arcade room, and a home gym. Outside, there are ponds that are stocked with fish.”

Bedroom
Bedroom

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Bedroom
Bedroom

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Bedroom
Bedroom

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Bathroom
Bathroom

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Guests who are exhausted after all the activities on tap will have plenty of places to sleep and recharge.

The main house offers six bedrooms, including a master suite as well as a one-bedroom apartment with a separate entrance. Two other apartments are on the property.

“You can go outside to get there, but they do connect to the main house. One is a two-bedroom apartment, and the other one is a three-bedroom apartment. That adds five more bedrooms,” Hogan says.

A large caretaker’s residence has two bedrooms. With this much space, there’s room for all guests to spread out and enjoy themselves.

Hogan tells us that the mansion’s layout is ideal for long-term guests.

“If you have guests that are staying for an extended period of time, whether it’s friends, family members, or business associates, they can have their own quarters,” she says.

Kitchen
Kitchen

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Kitchen
Kitchen

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Dining space
Dining space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Dining space
Dining space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Each apartment has its own kitchen, and the main house has a large main kitchen with a catering kitchen nearby. There are also two large dining areas, one more formal than the other.

Owners and guests will have plenty of places to park, thanks to a 29-car garage with space enough for an RV.

Garage
Garage

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Garage
Garage

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Garage
Garage

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

The house is being sold fully furnished, with the exception of a few personal items.

“We have had a complete inventory of all the furnishings done by a professional. It’s approximately 60 pages long, with every item, and photos,” Hogan adds.

Wine cellar
Wine cellar

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Living space
Living space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Living space
Living space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

The sale also includes all of the artwork and all the bottles in the extensive wine cellar.

The home has been on the market for a couple of years and was once listed for more than $20 million.

Hogan says the pool of possible buyers who want this size of house at this kind of price tag in the Denver area is limited.

“This is toward the upper end in Denver,” she says, adding that the current price reflects what the market can bear, rather than its true value.

“The seller probably has at least twice the current asking price into the property. You have to be realistic, and a property has to reflect the market.”

Living space
Living space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

The Turner family isn’t using the house as much as they used to, so it’s time to sell.

“Lives changed, and people go in different directions. Kids grow up, and all the things that we see happen with these large, legacy homes,” Hogan says. “They still use the property, but not the way that they did for many years. It’s just time to move on.”

Although the house is huge, Hogan says it still feels warm and welcoming.

“There are many intimate areas within the house,” she says. “Every time I show it, people remark on the fact that they’re able to find spaces where they don’t feel like they’re overwhelmed with the size, and they can have privacy.”

Gym
Gym

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Boardroom
Boardroom

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Living space
Living space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Game room
Game room

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Outdoor space
Outdoor space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Game room
Game room

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Living space
Living space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Outdoor space
Outdoor space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Living space
Living space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

Outdoor space
Outdoor space

Estate Photo Video/ Michael Hefron

  • For more photos and details, check out the full listing.
  • Homes for sale in Parker, CO
  • Learn more about Parker, CO

Source: realtor.com

Meet the Man Who Makes $600 a Month Selling Crickets

June 23, 2017 &• 4 min read by Kat Tretina Comments 0 Comments

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When Jeff Neal’s wife told him she wanted to quit her job to stay at home with their kids, he had to think about how to make one income work. With over $21,000 in student loans, there wasn’t much extra money lying around. Losing another income stream would be difficult.

But rather than give up hope, Neal did something no one expected. He launched a side business that helped bring in extra money: selling crickets online.

Yes, you heard that right. Crickets.

Now, Neal makes $600 a month selling bugs online at The Critter Depot, which helps him pay off his debt. Read on to learn more about this odd side hustle and how Neal has turned it into a steady income stream.

Searching for a Side Hustle

Neal graduated from Temple University and got a job as a project manager. While he made a good salary, he had student loan debt and a growing family. When his wife decided she wanted to stay home with the kids, Neal knew he had to make changes.

“My wife wanted to stay home, so I had to take full responsibility as the sole provider,” he says.

Since his full-time job involves e-commerce, he focused his side-hustle search on online jobs. After doing extensive research, he decided to put all of his efforts on one specific niche.

The area that he identified was in the pet industry; reptile and exotic animal owners need live crickets to feed their pets, but getting them can be difficult — and expensive. So, Neal’s site caters to pet owners, selling crickets of various sizes in bulk.

But before you rush out and buy tanks and crickets to replicate Neal’s success, you should know his approach is even more interesting. He actually doesn’t deal with the crickets at all. Instead, his business is a drop shipping company.

What Is Drop Shipping?

Drop shipping is a business model where the store doesn’t stock any of the items it sells. Instead, when a customer purchases a product, the drop shipper works with a manufacturer — or in this case, a cricket supplier — to fulfill the order. The drop shipper never comes into contact with the product, so wrangling crickets isn’t part of Neal’s day.

“I don’t know anything about raising crickets,” he admits. “They have short life spans and unique nutritional and environmental needs. It’s a lot of work that takes a lot of knowledge. When I set up my business, I found someone who breeds crickets. He takes care of them and ships them; I just handle the orders.”

For customers, drop shipping is a seamless process, whether it’s through Amazon or a private site. Most of the time, you don’t know when you’re buying from a drop shipper. Once your order is placed, the drop shipper works with the supplier to place the order, and you receive the item like you normally would.

Drop shipping can be a mutually beneficial relationship between the seller and supplier. In Neal’s case, he has the marketing expertise and skills to build a successful website and business. That gets the cricket farmer more exposure and more orders than he would get on his own. Neal estimates that he generates about $3,000 in sales each month from The Critter Depot and his cut is $600.

Previously, Neal primarily sold crickets on Amazon. But meeting Amazon’s strict standards is hard when you’re shipping live insects. He ended up taking his sales to just his website, which requires more work for him each day to build traffic.

His new income stream allows him to take advantage of other opportunities, too. He recently purchased the site Jason Coupon King, which generates another $700 a month in revenue.

Balancing a Side Gig With Life & Work

While Neal’s side hustle is successful, he has to balance his work with his full-time job and his family. But that’s why he says drop shipping is a great option. It gives him the flexibility he needs while still allowing him to earn extra money.

“I don’t have a television, so when I come home from work, I just spend time playing with the kids and catching up with my wife,” says Neal. “Once they’re in bed, I work on optimizing my websites, contributing to forums and building links to my sites.”

Neal says he spends an hour or two a day after work on his side hustle and that his business is still growing. The extra income is substantial enough to help him pay off his student loans early and give his family more wiggle room in their monthly budget. (You can keep tabs on your own finances by viewing two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.)

Making Extra Money

While selling crickets might not be for you, Neal’s story is just another example of the many ways you can make money on the side. If you’re struggling to make ends meet, or need more income to pay down debt or boost your emergency fund, launching a side hustle can be the right approach.

Photo courtesy of Jeff Neal 


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Source: credit.com

The Market Crash Is Coming! (…Eventually)

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Here on the Best Interest, I provide a lot of “you should be investing!” advice. I talk about the power of long-term investments. And stock market strategies. And even about my specific investment choices. But today is different. Today’s post is about the upcoming market crash. Well…it’s coming eventually.

Perhaps you’ve come to believe that I’m an unwavering bull. A pure optimist. That I think investments can do nothing but increase in value. But that’s not true. I know the crash will come. It always does.

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And that might seem scary. If the crash is coming, then why not do something about it? So that’s what today’s post is about. Even though we’re aware that a market crash is coming (eventually), we can take a step back and think about it rationally.

Being a Bull Before the Market Crash

Here’s a prediction.

I predict that I will eventually make a blog post where I say something like,

“I bought some shares of an index fund this month—just like every other month. And I think it’s one of the smartest things you can do as an investor.”

And after that future blog post, the market will proceed to fall 30% over the next few months.

Some people will then look at the Best Interest and think, “Pfff! This guy Jesse doesn’t have a clue what he’s talking about! He invested a few thousand bucks right before the market crashed!! What a dummy!”

I’m calling it now. It’ll happen. And I understand why it will appear like I’d be a dummy.

So let’s dig in. Am I a dummy?

Dummy Test GIFs | Tenor

Historical Data: The Market Crash Always Comes

The market crash always comes eventually.

Bear markets—where the stock market value drops by 20% or more from its previous high—have occurred 12 times since 1929.

Years of Bear Markets Percent Drawdown from Previous High
1929 – late 30s (Great Depression) -86%
1956 – 57 -22%
1961 – 62 (Flash Crash of ’62) -28%
1966 -22%
1968 – 70 -36%
1973 – 78 (Bretton Woods + Oil Crisis) -48%
1980 – 82 -27%
1987 – 88 (Black Monday) -34%
1990 -20%
2001 – 05 (Dot Com Bubble) -49%
2008 – 09 (Financial Crisis) -56%
2020 (COVID) -32%

The market ebbs and flows, oscillating between “unsustainable optimism and unjustified pessimism.” If we believe the assumption that stock prices are current unsustainably optimistic, then it’s believable that a serious bear market could happen in the next few years.

But lesser corrections—typically defined as at least a 10% drawdown—occur even more frequently. Since 1950, there have been 37 corrections of 10% or more. That’s more frequent than one every two years.

It doesn’t take Nostradamus to predict a future market downswing. I’m not calling a 1-in-1000 event. Market corrections happen all the time.

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“But if he gets elected…!!!”

You can find arguments from both sides of the political aisle that certain parties lead to better stock market performance. But let’s investigate the data itself.

First, let’s look at the president only. But heed warning: this is a slightly dangerous game. Does the president alone have enough influence to affect the stock market? Will the answers we find here be conclusive of causation? Or will they only present correlation?

From 1926 to 2020, we have 95 years of S&P 500 data. During that time, we’ve had 48 years of Democratic leadership and 47 years of Republican leadership. Republican years saw an average S&P 500 return of 9.0%, while Democratic years saw an average return of 14.9%.

That’s a pretty big difference! But is it causal i.e. one thing causes the other to occur? Can a system as complicated as the stock market be tied down to a single influencing variable like the president’s political party? Probably not.

After all, that’s only 23 presidential terms and 15 individual presidents. Eight Republicans and seven Democrats. Not exactly a huge sample set.

Keep this in mind for the next time a President tweet-brags about the stock market’s success.

President + Congress

But there is another working theory worth inspecting. The theory is that our government is more efficient when the Congress (both Houses) is controlled by the President’s party. If the President and Congress work together effectively, then we all benefit. It’s a “teamwork makes the dream work” situation.

In the 95-year period since 1926, we’ve had 48 years of President/Congress unification (14 years Republican and 34 years Democrat) and 47 years of division (33 with a Republican president and 14 with a Democrat). The market performance during these periods is very interesting.

President / Congress S&P 500 Average Annual Return
Dem / Dem (34 years) 14.5%
Repub / Repub (14 years) 13.9%
Dem / Repub or Split (14 years) 15.9%
Repub / Dem or Split (33 years) 7.0%
Total Unified (48 years) 14.3%
Total Divided (47 years) 9.7%

Is this causal? Does a unified Federal government ensure that the economy and stock market perform better? I doubt it’s conclusive. But it is interesting nonetheless.

The market trends upwards no matter who is in office, but it appears that political cooperation might help grease the wheels.

The Silver Lining of Market Crashes

Back when we consulted Mr. Market, one big takeaway was:

The only two prices that ever matter are the price when you buy and the price when you sell.

Ask yourself: what are your investing plans are for the next few years? Are you going to be a buyer—someone who is investing for the future? Or are you going to be a seller—someone who has invested for the past few decades and now wants to live off those investments?

If you’re a buyer, then a market crash has a pretty significant silver lining. Cheaper prices! If the market declines, then you get to invest at lower prices. It’s the easiest way to increase your long-term investing potential. Buy low, sell high. Dollar-cost average investors relish these chances to decrease their cost basis.

If you’re a seller, let’s look at how your past 30 years have been. The S&P 500 value was around ~350 in 1990. And now it’s at ~3500, or about 10x higher. If the market drops 20% next week to 2800, then your returns are only ~8x compared to 1990. But an 8x return ain’t bad!

“If the market crash is coming…why not sell now and wait to re-invest after the prices drop?”

Before I answer the question above, let’s consult Peter Lynch—who is considered one of the most successful investors of all-time.

Far more money has been lost by investors preparing for corrections than has been lost in corrections themselves.

Peter Lynch

What exactly is Lynch saying? How do people lose money by “preparing” for corrections?

People lose money “preparing” for corrections because they sell too soon and then don’t know when to buy back in. It’s that simple. Both actions—selling too soon and not buying back in soon enough—can cause investors to miss out of years of growth and years of dividends.

That’s why Peter Lynch’s quote rings so true. Timing the market is hard.

So we don’t sell in preparation for a crash. But what about saving up cash and waiting to buy? Why not hold cash, wait for the 10% drop (that we know happens every 2 years, or so) and buy in then?

Well, I looked at that too. Back in March ’20, my “Viral Stock Market Strategies” article (get it? viral?!) looked at an assortment of supposed strategies that involved holding onto cash while waiting for the market to drop. I back-tested these strategies against the historical S&P 500 data, and simple dollar-cost averaging beats all the “wait for a drop” strategies.

You think there’s a market crash coming? I know, me too (eventually). There’s certainly a chance that holding onto cash and waiting for the crash is correct right now. But if you try that tactic over time, it’s a losing strategy.

Don’t sell. And don’t wait to buy. Carry on with your normal investing cadence.

Don’t do something. Just sit there.

Jack Bogle

“But what if it’s the crash?!”

What if what’s coming is the big market crash? The mother-of-all-crashes! What if society falls apart? Or if a meteor hits Earth and life changes as we know it? What if we all start scavenging for beans and scrap metal and fuel for our souped-up dirt bikes?

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Mad Max – where fuel and water are all that matter.

Scary questions, but they have a pretty simple answer. If an existential threat ruins your investments, then the stock market will be the least of your worries. That’s it. If “the big one” hits, then the stock market will be one of many societal structures that no longer matter.

If it’s not “the big one,” then the market will recover. It always does.

Why? Why does the market always bounce back? In part, it’s because humans are resilient. We learn and grow and work towards progress. While this year’s COVID market recovery can be attributed to many different factors—like the Federal Reserve lowering interest rates—it can also be attributed to human resiliency.

If “the big one” is coming, then shouldn’t you just “YOLO” and spend your money now? Yeah, you should. I suppose we all need to do some probability analysis.

  • What are the odds that “the big one” is about to come and you look stupid that your investments become worthless?
  • What are the odds that “the big one” never comes and you wish that you had invested in your younger years to enable retirement?

I’ll take my chances and save for retirement.

Crash Landing

So, am I a dummy? I hope I’ve convinced you otherwise.

A 90s Kid's Journey Through the Disney Canon: March 2015

Even though we know that the stock market will eventually succumb to 10%, 20%, or even larger drawdowns, there’s no basis that you’ll benefit by trying to wait or time that market crash. It might work, but it usually doesn’t. That’s what the historical data tell us.

Waiting for the election doesn’t matter either. Democrats, Republicans…the market does its own thing. There might be some causality, but it’s tough to tell.

There are silver linings in corrections and crashes. If you’re investing for the long-term, then corrections enable cheaper prices and greater returns.

And if this market crash is “the big one,” then none of this really matters. It’s hard to blog if the electrical grid fails.

If you enjoyed this article and want to read more, I’d suggest checking out my Archive or Subscribing to get future articles emailed to your inbox.

This article—just like every other—is supported by readers like you.

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Tagged crash, stock market, timing

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Is a Fixer-Upper Home Worth the Investment?

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Buying fixer-upper homes is currently a popular investment in the housing market, especially since lower-priced houses increase housing confidence in home buyers. On the one hand, it is a great way to purchase a home below market value and sell it for more than you paid. On the other hand, it often seems to be more work than people anticipate, and sometimes the final product doesn’t end up being worth as much time, effort, and money as people put into it.

So, is a fixer-upper home worth it? The answer depends on a variety of factors and your current situation. Thankfully, we have a list of pros and cons as well as tips and recommendations if you’re trying to decide if a fixer-upper home is the right decision for you.

The Pros

  • You have more creative leeway. You can build, renovate, and design the house the way you want.
  • You can decide what places in the home you want to spend more money on (i.e., a better kitchen or a better bedroom).
  • You have the opportunity to make the home worth a great deal more than you paid.
  • You can likely flip the home for more money
  • Fixer-upper homes are typically 8% below the market value.
  • You will pay less in property taxes because they are calculated based on your home’s sale price.
  • If you have a home warranty, you can save money on replacing and repairing broken appliances and systems.

The Cons

  • Most fixer-upper homes are not move-in ready.
  • Renovations are costly.
  • You also don’t have an exact total of what everything will cost, making the financial bottom line uncertain.
  • Fixer-upper homes can be a risk. You never know when things are going to go wrong, so you have to anticipate possible complications.
  • If you need to make structural changes, you’ll need a building permit, which is around $1,000, according to HomeAdvisor.
  • It can take months or even longer to finish a fixer-upper.

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Do a Home Inspection

If you are interested in a fixer-upper home, you want to begin with a home inspection. The inspector will likely be able to determine whether the home is worth the investment or not, depending on the severity of the necessary renovations.

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Note that if the necessary improvements in the house are structural, such as roof and/or wall issues, it’s likely not worth the investment. These type of renovations are complicated and extremely expensive. They are also not typically noticeable by potential buyers, so they fail to raise the value of your home enough to make up for the money you invested. However, if you have a written report from your home inspector listing the major issues and the estimated repair costs, you might be able to get the seller to lower the cost of the house to account for the added repairs you’ll have to do.

Get an Estimate of Renovation Costs

Deciding if a fixer-upper home is worth it is heavily influenced by the estimated cost of renovations. As stated above, home inspectors can often help you with this. Note all of the necessary renovations and how much they will cost by using a home inspector or a contractor; it’s better to over quote this than under quote. Then you want to subtract this from the home’s projected market value (after repairs and renovations). You can estimate a home’s market value by researching the neighboring homes’ values. Finally, you need to deduct 5 to 10 percent more for possible complications and other possibilities.

Determine If You Need Permits

Depending on your area, you might need permits to do certain renovations. If you build without obtaining the proper permits, you could have difficulty selling the house in the future. Make sure you have the money to get the required permits before committing to remodeling.

Identify the Skills You Have and What You Can DIY

Part of purchasing a fixer-upper is having to do much of the work on your own. Decide if you have the skills to do the necessary renovations. If you can do most of the repairs by yourself, figure out what you can DIY and hire someone to do the rest. If you’re doing most of the labor, all you need are the parts and equipment for the renovations, and you won’t have to waste money paying someone else.

If you don’t have the ability to do a large chunk of the workload yourself, consider staying away from a fixer-upper home. Hiring someone to do most of the work for you will likely cost more than the renovations are worth in value.

Make Sure You Have the Time—and the Motivation

Fixer-upper homes require a considerable amount of time. If you think you’re too busy to manage the home renovations, consider going with a move-in ready home instead. Especially if you delay pressing repairs, you could risk losing money and value in your home.

Along with a time sacrifice, fixer-uppers require motivation to deal with such a huge project. Ensure you have the motivation and determination to finish renovations before committing to a fixer-upper home. You don’t want to take the plunge and buy the home just to get burnt out halfway through and regret your decision.

Check Financing Options

Buying a fixer-upper home is more financially complicated than your typical finished home; you will need money for the routine down payment and closing costs, but you will also need money for the home repairs and any possible complications in the renovation process.

If you don’t have enough money for the renovations up front, there are borrowing options such as the 203(k) loan that is meant for home repair, improvement, and reconstruction. A multitude of other loan options can ease the financial difficulty.

Avoid Being House Poor

Being house poor is when you spend the majority of your income on your home ownership. This can include your mortgage payment, property taxes, utilities, maintenance costs, etc. If choosing a fixer-upper home is going to take the majority of your money, you’re most likely better off to wait until you have additional income to handle the financial burden.

Take into account your debt-to-income ratio (DTI) when deciding if a fixer-upper home will make you house poor. Your DTI is all of your monthly debt payments divided by your gross monthly income. Generally, a 36 percent or lower DTI is ideal.

Plan for Complications

With fixer-upper homes comes unpredictability. There are unexpected issues and costs that can leave you scrambling if you’re not prepared. Although you can’t predict the future, you can still take precautions so you are as prepared as possible if something goes wrong, whether that be additional expenses, time constraints, etc. You don’t want to be left in a tough spot because you assumed everything would go as planned.

The Bottom Line

Fixer-upper homes can be a great home investment, but a great deal of responsibility and financial burden comes with it. Make sure you have the resources and the time to manage such a project. If you do, use the above tips in your fixer-upper journey. If not, maybe consider a move-in ready home or you could postpone the fixer-upper project until you are more prepared.

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‘Daily Show’ Host Trevor Noah Reportedly Buys Bel-Air Mansion for $27.5M>

The host of the “Daily Show,” Trevor Noah, has picked up another purchase in Bel-Air, the L.A. Times reported. 

The comedian has shown that he has seriously expensive taste in real estate, splashing out a whopping $27.5 million on a luxury mansion in the swanky Los Angeles neighborhood. The deal closed at the end of the year, realtor.com® records show.

The contemporary mansion had been on the market for as much as $36 million in 2018, but the price was reduced over the years. It was first cut to $32.5 million and landed at $29.5 million in 2020, before Noah scooped it up for an even lower amount.

If the transaction seems familiar, it’s because it isn’t his first foray into the Bel-Air market. In 2019, the stand-up star purchased a posh pad in the same area for $20.5 million. He then flipped that mansion for $21.7 million in August. He has now jumped back into the real estate game with an even pricier property. 

Designed by the architect Mark Rios and built in 2014, the home spans 11,000 square feet and offers indoor-outdoor living, with city and ocean views. 

The roomy floor plan includes six bedrooms, eight full bathrooms, and three powder rooms, in a residence surrounded by gardens and pathways. Floor-to-ceiling glass doors in the living area lead out to a pool. The main level layout also features a chef’s kitchen, formal dining room, and den.

Upstairs, the master suite features dual bathrooms and walk-in wardrobes. Another four en suite bedrooms, office, or staff quarters complete the second floor.

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Watch: Jeff Foxworthy Lists His Dream Home in Georgia

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Other luxe amenities include a gym, spa, office, lounge, third-floor screening room with rooftop terrace, and a separate guest suite with a game room.

The property is also equipped with an elevator and Crestron automation, as well as a security office and motor court.

Noah, 36, has hosted the “Daily Show” since 2015. He has been delivering a stripped-down show from his Manhattan condo since the coronavirus pandemic.

The show, now dubbed “The Daily Social Distancing Show with Trevor Noah,” features him wearing a seemingly limitless wardrobe of hoodies in varying shades. He picked up the Hell’s Kitchen penthouse for $10 million in 2017.

The South African has been sharing his good fortune, and has reportedly been paying the salaries of 25 of his crew himself, since they were put on furlough when the in-studio production was halted.

It seems he can afford it. Forbes ranked the Emmy-award winning entertainer as the fourth highest-paid comedian in 2019, with a reported income of $28 million, mainly for his stand-up shows. His memoir, “Born a Crime,” was a critically heralded New York Times bestseller.

Linda May with Hilton & Hyland represented the seller. Jonah Wilson with Hilton & Hyland represented the buyer.

Source: realtor.com

How to prepare your home for a winter open house

The winter season can be a great time to sell your house, but while your competition is reduced, success during this time can still depend on a successful open house. To help make your open house as effective as possible, follow these tips.

  • Take down your decorations. The holidays are over, but if you’re the type that likes to leave the decorations up for a time, taking them down before your open house is a good idea. Prospective buyers may not celebrate the same holidays as you and you don’t want to alienate them.
  • Clear the clutter. If you haven’t put those holiday gifts away yet, now’s the time. Prospective buyers should be able to focus on your home instead of the collection of things crowding it. Give them nice open spaces to move about and they’ll be appreciative.
  • Turn up the heat. Warm and cozy is more than a catch phrase during the winter. Bring the temperature up in your home slightly during your open house to keep your guests comfortable. If they are too cold in your home, they aren’t apt to stay long.
  • Plan for winter apparel. Be it jackets or boots, take extra steps to prepare your entryway for the added material your buyers will bring with them. A designated spot to place these items can make guests feel welcome and keep your home cleaner during the showing and beyond.

Source: century21.com