How to Add Your Business to Yelp and Optimize Your Listing

If you’re like most Internet users, you’ve used a business listing or directory website to find a restaurant, specialty store, tax preparer, or other service provider in your area.

Yelp, arguably the most popular business information directory for customer-facing services businesses, welcomes many millions of unique visitors per month. According to Expanded Ramblings, Yelp draws more than 175 million monthly visitors, with mobile traffic accounting for the majority.

Consumers use Yelp to search for service providers near them, navigating to its website or mobile app for a few minutes at a time and closing out when they’ve found what they’re looking for. But business owners have a much more intimate relationship with business directory sites like Yelp. For many small, independent outfits, business listings represent a significant source of new customers — far more than word of mouth marketing alone. If your small business doesn’t yet have a listing, it could be time to set one up.

Yelp for Business Owners: Does It Make Sense to List Your Company?

Yelp isn’t ideal for every type of business. Generally speaking, the most popular Yelp searches pertain to businesses that offer sensory experiences, such as restaurants, bars, venues, and specialized experience providers like tour companies. Searches for retailers — both independent and those tied to a larger chain — are popular as well.

Other popular Yelp categories include:

  • Hotels and travel services
  • Beauty shops and spas
  • Automotive
  • Home services, such as house cleaning, plumbing, and general contracting
  • Health and medical

Yelp also segments listed companies by location: county, municipality, and sometimes neighborhoods (mostly in bigger cities). If your business lives and dies by the number of people who walk into its physical location — for instance, you run a restaurant or retail outlet that does a large amount of business through a storefront — a business directory listing is basically mandatory.

On the other hand, if your company doesn’t have a storefront or doesn’t rely on one to drive sales — for instance, if you sell things online — then other means of driving customers to your business, such as social media marketing techniques or a listing on an e-commerce website like Etsy, are likely to offer a better payoff.

Pros of Listing Your Business on Yelp

Listing a business on Yelp has some key benefits, including legitimacy for businesses who’ve claimed their listings, high search rankings for Yelp business profiles and business owner accounts, and value for customer research.

1. Claimed Listings Confer Legitimacy

Regardless of how much effort you put into optimizing and curating it, the simple act of claiming your business directory listing can change how prospective customers see your business. On most business directories, including Yelp, unclaimed listings are plainly displayed as such. To the man or woman on the street, a highly visible prompt to claim a particular listing — which takes a matter of minutes — doesn’t inspire confidence that the listed business is well-run, or that the owner cares about courting new customers.

Although this is an admittedly subjective measure of an owner’s buy-in or a business’s quality, I know that I personally shy away from businesses with unclaimed directory listings unless they’re backed by a recognizable brand or I’m familiar with them by other means, such as word of mouth.

2. Listings Typically Rank Well in Organic Search (Good for SEO)

Although the details of popular search engines’ algorithms are proprietary and ever-changing, it’s clear that online directory listings rank highly in organic search results — the lists you see when you type a search term into the Google or Bing search bar.

The upshot of this: Unless its name can easily be confused with common or generic terms like “Tasty Pizza,” a typical business’s Yelp listings are likely to appear on the first results page of a search engine — an important point, since most searchers never make it to subsequent results pages. And because Yelp is a well-known and ostensibly unbiased source of information, searchers who want to get the unvarnished truth on a given business are likely to click on the results for its listings.

3. Consumers Rely Heavily on Directory Listings for Research

Despite a recent study reported by PCMag that found roughly 40% of online reviews to be bogus, 60% of consumers consider online review sites as useful as recommendations from real-life acquaintances, according to a 2017 ReportLinker survey. In an increasingly jaded world, that’s a pretty high mark — and a strong case for creating and maintaining listings on popular directory sites.

Cons of Listing Your Business on Yelp

Listing your business on Yelp does have some drawbacks, including a significant time component, limited control over reviews, and the potential for abuse.

1. Maintaining Your Business Profile Takes Time and Resources

Claiming or creating a business listing doesn’t take much time or effort. You can handle either in a spare moment.

However, optimizing and maintaining your listing is not so easy. Even free activities such as uploading photos, analyzing customer data, and responding to reviews all take time that you likely don’t have as a busy entrepreneur. If you have other social media accounts or an online store, your digital responsibilities could become overwhelming, diverting your attention from more immediate business needs.

One solution is to hire a part- or full-time marketing employee or social media manager, but that requires a new addition to the payroll — not always a realistic proposition for cash-poor small business owners. Another option is to retain an outside firm to handle your digital marketing needs, although that can be just as expensive as hiring a part-time employee.

If you currently lack the time or resources to produce a first-rate business directory profile, there’s no shame in concluding that it’s better to wait until you do have those luxuries. If you can’t do it right, don’t feel pressured to do it at all.

2. May Not Display All Users’ Yelp Reviews (or Any at All)

In the late 2000s and early 2010s, some online business directories — particularly Yelp — took lots of blowback for failing to do their part to contain the untold millions of fake reviews spreading across the Internet. Fake directory reviews came in several different flavors, but it was particularly common for listed businesses to purchase positive reviews — typically with gushing praise and the highest possible ratings — for their own listings, or post positive reviews themselves using dummy accounts. In competitive markets, less scrupulous companies likewise had no qualms about posting fake negative reviews on competitors’ listings.

Although they haven’t totally eradicated fake reviews, online directory sites have definitely cracked down on the practice. In fact, the crackdown has been so good that some legitimate reviews don’t make it through the directories’ quality filters, which are controlled by proprietary algorithms similar to those used by search engines.

If you want the opportunity to see — and ensure that your customers see — every review of your business, good or bad, this is a big drawback. And although the particulars of directories’ visibility-controlling algorithms aren’t public, one can envision an algorithm deciding that an overly enthusiastic but legitimate positive review is a fake while allowing a tepid review to be seen.

3. Directory Listings Contain Sensitive Information

If you need your customers to come to your physical place of business, they need to know where it’s located and how to contact it. A restaurant can’t survive if no one’s coming in to eat or calling to order takeout.

On the other hand, there are times when it’s better to conceal your business location, and possibly contact information, from the public. For instance, say you provide white-collar services, such as accounting or legal advice, to local businesses — but you typically visit with clients at their offices and don’t want them to know you work out of a home office or coworking hub. Listing your home address as your business address reveals where you live, while listing a coworking space can lead judgmental clients or your competitors to conclude that you can’t afford a “real” office.

Note that if an unclaimed listing already exists for your business, you may need to claim it and edit out sensitive information or request its removal altogether.

4. Your Listing Could Attract Abuse

Even if you’re not paranoid about people knowing where you live or looking down on you for basing your company out of a coworking space, there’s another reason to eschew a public business directory listing: the prospect that your listing could become a venue for abusive or hateful reviews.

Because business directory sites allow rank-and-file Internet users to post reviews on a given business’s listing without proving that they’ve actually interacted with the company in real life, it’s relatively easy to organize a negative publicity campaign utilizing Yelp or another directory site that permits user reviews. (Directories occasionally step in to delete or moderate obscene or threatening reviews, particularly in response to user flags, but you shouldn’t bank on this to single-handedly keep vitriolic reviews off your listing.)

These negative campaigns typically center around a major service gaffe or prominent public support for a controversial political position. A great example: In early 2015, the owners of a small-town Indiana pizzeria called Memories Pizza made headlines when they said they would follow the letter of the state’s recently passed Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which many observers interpreted as giving businesses wide latitude to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation. The ensuing backlash saw thousands of sarcastic, occasionally obscene comments posted on Memories Pizza’s website. The Indianapolis Star reported that the shop closed shortly thereafter, with the owners citing safety concerns.

In the past, lower-profile incidents of a similar nature have hit businesses expressing opposition to state minimum wage increases or support for creationism and intelligent design. To be fair, some argue that the old saying, “All press is good press,” applies here, as negative directory campaigns sometimes spark a backlash that pays off for the affected business. It’s worth noting that, as reported by Forbes, Memories Pizza raised more than $800,000 in a GoFundMe crowdfunding campaign in the four days following its closure.


How to Claim or Create Your Yelp Listing

Yelp uses publicly available and user-submitted information to generate listings for operational businesses. If you’ve been open for some time, there’s a good chance you’re already in Yelp’s database. Yelp allows the legitimate owners of such a business to “claim” their existing profile.

Claiming your profile provides certain privileges:

  • Updating Listing Information. You can edit critical information about your business, including its physical address, phone number, business hours, and website address. This is important because Yelp doesn’t guarantee that its unclaimed business listings are accurate.
  • Adding Photos and Links. You can upload photos of your storefront, merchandise, and the inside of your business. This is great for restaurant owners who want to show off tasty-looking menu items, or service providers who want to display photos of a van or truck bearing a distinctive logo, which users are more likely to recognize than a faceless storefront or generic uniform.
  • Interacting With Reviewers. Claimed profile owners can respond to user-generated reviews, either by sending the user a private message through Yelp’s system or making a public post on the comments feed. This is particularly useful for owners who want to address negative feedback from users and contain issues that could hurt business. Note that you can’t edit or delete negative reviews, which might call Yelp’s objectivity into question, but you can respond to them.
  • User Views and Leads. Yelp tracks your listing’s page views and displays this information to verified business owners. It also creates Customer Leads, which provide hints about how customers are interacting with your business. Data sources for Customer Leads include:
    • Mobile check-ins
    • Mobile calls made directly to your business using Yelp’s on-site click-to-call feature
    • Map views
    • Click-throughs from your Yelp listing to your company website
    • User-uploaded photos on your business page
    • Bookmarks placed on your listing using Yelp’s bookmark feature

Claiming an Existing Business Listing

To get started, click Yelp’s “Claim Your Listing” button, then type in your exact business name and city. This takes you to a results page that displays similarly named businesses nearby and indicates whether they’ve been claimed. If your business is listed, it should say that it hasn’t been claimed.

To claim your listing, you need to create a Yelp account with your first name, last name, email address, and password. Make sure the phone number on your listing is accurate, then click “Call Me Now.” This prompts Yelp to robo-call the listed business number with a unique verification code.

Once you receive that code, you can enter it into the proper field and start editing your listing. If you’re unable to complete the phone verification process for any reason, you can also manually verify your identity as the business owner by emailing Yelp’s support team.

Creating a New Business Listing

If your business doesn’t have an existing listing to claim, you need to create one. At the bottom of the business search results page, click the “Add a Business” button and enter as much information as possible into the fields on the next screen: your business name, exact address, phone number, and website at a minimum.

After you submit this information, it takes Yelp some time — usually no more than two business days — to verify that the business exists and add it to its listings. Once added, you can search for it as described and claim the listing as your own.


How to Optimize Your Yelp Listing

Claiming or creating a Yelp listing is an important first step. However, building a top-notch Yelp presence takes time and effort.

These tips and resources are useful as you work to set your listing apart from your competitors’:

1. Fill Out Your Profile Completely

The more complete your listing is, the better it looks to Yelp’s internal algorithm — and the higher it’s likely to appear on Yelp’s search results pages. There’s no reason not to fill out your profile completely.

2. Use Google Keyword Planner or a Similar Tool

Yelp listings are visible to Google and other search engines, so it pays to use a keyword planning tool — such as Google Keyword Planner, which requires a free Google AdWords account to use — to identify keywords that relate to your company.

For instance, if you specialize in Neapolitan-style pizza and discover that your company website ranks highly for the term “Neapolitan pizza,” make sure that keyword appears at least once in your business listing.

3. Add Lots of Photos

Photos breathe life into your Yelp listing and boost customer engagement. An internal Yelp study found that consumers linger on photo-enhanced Yelp pages for two and a half times as long than on pages with no photos.

Photos are especially useful for showing off your logo — particularly if it’s already plastered on your company’s vans or outdoor advertising properties, and thus recognizable to prospective customers — as well as for highlighting particular products, especially food. If your business is open to the public, include pictures of its interior and outdoor seating areas to give visitors a sense of what to look forward to.

4. Solicit and Respond to Customer Reviews

Yelp frowns on businesses that court reviews by giving away free stuff or offering special deals to those who post positive reviews — it sees this behavior as a form of manipulation. However, you can skirt this prohibition and stay in Yelp’s good graces by placing the Yelp logo in a visible location in your store (such as at checkout or on a menu), linking to your Yelp page from your company website, and straight-up asking for reviews with no strings attached.

Separately, be sure to respond to detailed, thoughtful reviews, whether they’re good or bad. It’s especially important to respond to negative feedback, which shows other page visitors that you’re willing to address service issues and other problems. Just remember to follow social media etiquette best practices at all times.

5. Try Yelp Deals and Gift Certificates

Yelp Deals and Gift Certificates can help you monetize your Yelp listing and generate buzz around your business. Like Groupons and other social deals, both offer heavy discounts on transactions with the issuing business. Yelp Deals focus on discounts for specific local services — for instance, “20% off a haircut-and-shave package.” Yelp Gift Certificates offer across-the-board discounts — for example, “$20 in merchandise for $10.”

In both cases, Yelp takes a cut of the proceeds: 30% of face value for Deals and 10% of face value for Gift Certificates, subject to change with company policy.

6. Consider Buying Ads

If you can afford another line item in your marketing budget, consider buying ad space on Yelp. Yelp ads appear above the first non-promoted listing in Yelp’s internal search results pages, similar to the paid search ads you see on Google and other search engines.

Although they’re clearly marked “Ad,” they’re highly visible and appear only with relevant search terms, so they’re great for attracting people actively searching for what you have to offer. And because they effectively give you priority placement over competitors, they’re great if you operate in a crowded market.

Costs vary widely depending on your location and industry, but expect to spend at least $50 per month for a high-visibility ad campaign.


Final Word

Yelp isn’t the only business listing site worth looking into. There are dozens of other sites that could get your company’s name in front of potential customers. Listings on some of these sites are free to claim, while others require a one-time or monthly fee. Each has its own set of benefits and drawbacks.

Rather than spend significant amounts of time and marketing dollars going after them all, take a weekend or evening to research the options that work best for your business’s needs. Don’t be afraid to talk to other business owners in your industry, even if you’d normally be reluctant to share trade secrets with them. After all, with everything else you need to keep track of, the last thing you need is to make an investment with little to no chance of paying off.

Source: moneycrashers.com

15 Top Income-Earning Blogs: Make Money Online Blogging [Infographic]

Top Paid Bloggers

Top Paid Bloggers

Table of Contents

biggest reason why you should start a blogyet?

I hope this list of income-earning blogs inspires you and proves you can make money online through blogging.

15.  Making Sense of Cents

Founder – Michelle Schroeder-Gardner
Income – $146,498 per month.

MichelleSchroederGardner #15 top earning blogs

MichelleSchroederGardner #15 top earning blogsMichelle Schroeder-Gardner started Making Sense of Cents to “help improve my finances, keep track of my progress and to help readers improve their finances along the way.”

Well, let’s see — how has Schroeder-Gardner done in these areas?

She’s certainly improved her finances, paying off over $38,000 in student loan debt in just 7 months while growing the site’s revenue year-over-year.

Schroeder-Gardner has transparently tracked her progress in her popular monthly income reports.  She says the reports act as a journal for her and keeps her accountable, while also showing others that side income is possible.

And she’s also helping others with their finances by publishing thousands of how-to articles about earning more, saving more, and becoming financially fit.
Making Sense of Cents’ primary income comes from affiliate marketing.  You can see a complete breakdown of this profitable blog’s earnings here.

#14.  Smart Passive Income

Founder – Pat Flynn
Income – $152,276 per month.

Pat Flynn #14 top earning blogs

Pat Flynn #14 top earning blogsSmart Passive Income (SPI) founder Pat Flynn is a beacon of light in the sometimes dark and shady internet marketing space.

Calling himself a “crash test dummy of online business,” Flynn transparently shows what’s working and what isn’t working in his business.

His site details his online business experiments and gives readers actionable blueprints to follow and outlines mistakes to avoid.

Flynn didn’t invent the online income report, but he certainly popularized them.  He’s been publishing monthly income reports on the blog since 2008, detailing his income sources, revenue figures, as well as his expenses.  It’s still one of the most trafficked pages on the site.

Flynn is a great example of a blogger who has successfully branched out into other areas as well.

In 2010, Flynn launched the Smart Passive Income Podcast which is routinely in iTunes top 10 Business podcasts.  To date, the show has been downloaded an impressive 33 million times.

He also broadcasts Ask Pat, a Q and A online business podcast, and SPI TV for visual learners.

Flynn is now a Wall Street Journal best-selling author with 2016’s release of Will It Fly?.

And while his individual success has been plentiful and hard-earned, Flynn gives back by serving on the board of the non-profit Pencils of Promise, helping to build new schools for children in underprivileged regions around the world.
SPI’s primary income comes from affiliate marketing, with other earnings from podcast sponsorship and products.

#13.  Lifehacker

Founder – Gina Trapani
Income – $154,000 per month

Lifehacker Gina Trapani top paid blogger

Lifehacker Gina Trapani top paid bloggerLifehacker was founded in 2005 by Gina Trapani as part of the Gawker Media network.

From the start, Trapani acted as the sole contributor, writing 8 articles a day.  Talk about blogging like a boss!

She impressively launched the site with an exclusive sponsorship from Sony, rumored to be 3 months for $75,000.  Yeah, she’s a boss.

Lifehacker eventually added other contributors and the blog continued to grow in popularity.

As its motto claims, the site’s content is about “tips, tricks and downloads for getting things done.”

Trapani moved on from the company in 2009, and Nick Denton has run it ever since.

The site still churns out 18 articles a day, all designed to make you more productive.
Lifehacker earns its most of its revenue from advertising and it’s been one of the top-earning blogs since it’s inception.

#12.  Timothy Sykes

Founder – Timothy Sykes
Income – $165,000 per monthTimothy Sykes profitable blog

Timothy Sykes profitable blog

Timothy Sykes is a multimillionaire stock trader who famously earned $4 million while day trading in college.

As a high school student, Sykes took $12,415 of his bar mitzvah gift money and turned it into  $1.65 million by day trading penny stocks.

Not stopping there, Sykes has created a hedge fund and starred in the television program Wall Street Warriors.
These days, Sykes documents his trades and strategy on his popular blog, TimothySykes.com.  His top-earning blog offers a Millionaire Challenge and a successful subscription service where users can get real-time trading alerts and access a vast library of trading videos.

#11.  Tuts+

Founder – Collis Ta’eed, Cyan Ta’eed and Jun Rung
Income – $175,000 per month

2 Top Paid Bloggers2 Top Paid Bloggers
Cyan Ta’eed and Collis Ta’eed

Collis Ta’eed, Cyan Ta’eed and Jun Rung founded Tut+ as a modest blog with tutorials on freelancing and Photoshop.

The site ultimately grew into a network of 15 educational blogs, helping people learn profitable online skills, from coding to videography.

At the center of it all remains Tuts+.  In 2014, the group combined all 16 blogs into one central hub called Envato Tuts+.

Envato Tuts+ Premium, a subscription-based membership area offering video courses and ebooks, is the primary source of the site’s income.
You can still find plenty of free content to learn creative skills and yes, they still have tutorials on freelancing and Photoshop.

Tuts+ is one of my favorite blogs and it’s inspiring to know it started as a hobby and developed naturally and organically into one of the highest-earning blogs online.

#10.  Smashing Magazine

Founder – Sven Lennartz and Vitaly Friedman
Income – $215,000 per month

Vitaly Friedman Top Earning BlogsVitaly Friedman Top Earning Blogs
Vitaly Friedman

Smashing Magazine is the superb creation of Sven Lennartz and Vitaly Friedman.

The blog debuted in 2006 with the goal of helping people with web design and web development interests.

Today, Smashing Magazine is a go-to site for anyone looking to acquire these lucrative skills, with an enormous amount of informative and actionable content.

Not surprisingly, the blog receives 5 million page views a month.

The site now hosts frequent web development conferences and full-day workshops all over the world, to help both professionals and amateurs improve their craft.

This top earning blog’s main income comes from their membership area, where users can learn from an impressive number of tutorials covering everything from coding, web design, mobile app development, UX design, graphics and WordPress.

#9.  EOFire

Founder – John Lee Dumas
Income – $223,000 per month

EOFire top earning blog

EOFire top earning blogI’m convinced John Lee Dumas never sleeps.

He operates EOFire.com, short for Entrepreneurs on Fire, delivers a daily business podcast, and in recent years has published two best-selling journals — The Freedom Journal and The Mastery Journal.

But his bread and butter is the EOFire podcast, which is fantastic. In 2012, he noticed none of his favorite podcasts were podcasting daily, leaving him wanting more. So he launched his daily podcast interviewing entrepreneurs, and the rest, as they say, is history.

JLD, as he’s affectionately known, has now interviewed over 1600 entrepreneurs, including Tim Ferriss, Barbara Corcoran, Seth Godin and Gary Vaynerchuk.

In 2013, EOFire was named Best of iTunes.

His journals wrote the book (no pun intended) on how to run a successful crowdsourcing campaign.  And through a partnership with Pencils of Promise, Dumas is parlaying the success of his journals into the creation of schools in underprivileged countries.  You can see one of the schools Dumas made possible here.
EOFire earned a gross income of $595,936 in February of 2016. That’s an incredible feat for one month and well-deserved for JLD.

It’s always good to see good people doing good work and succeeding.

#8.  Gizmodo

Founder – Peter Rojas
Income – $325,000 per month

Peter Rojas is so awesome he’s on this list twice.Peter Rojas 2 top earning blogs

Peter Rojas 2 top earning blogs

Rojas created Gizmodo to cover technology, entertainment, politics, science and science fiction.

Gizmodo launched in 2002 as part of the Gawker Media network run by Nick Denton with Rojas as Editor in Chief.  The blog quickly grew in popularity by partnering with a variety of international firms to deliver translated versions of its content in Europe.

When you visit the site’s home page, one of the first things you notice is an above-the-fold banner that is larger than most.   As you scroll down, you’ll find Gizmodo does a great job of showing a lot of content with only a couple of display ads along the side, with one of them being the same advertiser found at the top of the page.  When you finally scroll past all the content (there’s a lot!) and reach the bottom of the page, you’ll find another large banner just above the footer, and yes, the advertiser is the same as in the other two spots.
Gizmodo’s home page has a great balance of being heavily content-focused but still being able to make a tidy profit with ads.   The ads are unobtrusive but still get noticed, and because of the repetition, the advertiser gets noticed too.  It’s a win-win advertising model for other sites to emulate.

#7.  Perez Hilton

Founder – Perez Hilton
Income – $575,000 per month

Perez Hilton runs a profitable blog

Perez Hilton runs a profitable blogPerez Hilton is a great example of a successful blogger who capitalized on other opportunities outside of blogging.  He’s also a television personality, nationally syndicated host of Radio Perez, and author of a children’s book.

But what he’s most famous for is his celebrity gossip blog PerezHilton.com.  Millions visit his site every day to revel in his brand of snarky gossip entertainment.
Hilton, born Mario Armondo Lavandeira Jr, started his blog as a hobby and decided to focus on Hollywood “because it was something I was inherently curious about, and fascinated with. And, let’s face it, celebrities — a lot of them — are crazy.”

This profitable blog earns its revenue from advertising banners on the site.

#6.  Copyblogger

Founder – Brian Clark
Income – $1,000,000 per month

With Copyblogger, Brian Clark created an audience-focused content marketing machine. Brian Clark #6 top earning blogs

Brian Clark #6 top earning blogs

In fact, Forbes recently called it “the most influential content marketing blog in the world.”

Copyblogger has been helping people write better, sell more, and get more traffic since 2006.

The site’s original tagline was “Internet Marketing For Smart People.”  In other words, they’re not selling snake oil and get rich quick schemes.

Now the tagline is “Words That Work” and boy, do they ever.  Clark and his team are outstanding at writing copy.

When I read they’re sales copy, I’m always compelled to buy. In fact, this site operates on their Genesis Framework and a StudioPress blog theme.
Based on their audience research and communication, they’ve strategically added tools and platforms to help content marketers and digital entrepreneurs grow their businesses.

#5.  Mashable

Founder – Pete Cashmore
Income – $2,000,000 per month

Pete Cashmore High Earning Boog

Pete Cashmore High Earning BoogMashable was started in 2005 by Pete Cashmore, a 19-year-old who still lived at home with his parents in Scotland.

He began by documenting the latest news about social media and emerging Internet technologies.

His work resonated with lots of folks and Mashable became an immediate success, attracting 2 million readers within the first 18 months.

Mashable has come a long way since those early days.  It’s no longer just Cashmore contributing Mashable’s content (they’re hiring!), and they are now headquartered in New York City.
Mashable is positioned to be one of the top-earning blogs online for some time.

The blog is still growing with over 45 million readers a month and the content has expanded to cover business, entertainment and lifestyle and now offers 5 international editions.

Mashable’s income primarily comes from advertisements on the site.

#4.  TechCrunch

Founder – Michael Arrington and Keith Teare
Income – $2,500,000 per month

Michael Arrington and Keith Teare started TechCrunch in 2005 to cover technology industry news.

Keith Teare topo earning blogs founderKeith Teare topo earning blogs founder
Keith Teare

The blog has grown immensely and now features big-name columnists in the startup and venture capital industries.

AOL bought TechCrunch in 2005 for a rumored $25 to $40 million..
TechCrunch earns revenue from display advertising on the blog   Specifically, they charge between $19.25 and $36.50 per CPM (Cost Per Thousand views).

According to the site, they receive 12 million visitors per month and 35 million page views per month.  With such a high CPM, you can see how this top-earning blog makes its considerable income.

#3.  Moz

Founder – Rand Fishkin and Gillian Muessig
Income – $3,300,000 per month

Rand Fishkin #3 highest earning blogsRand Fishkin #3 highest earning blogs
Rand Fishkin

Moz is the go-to place for all things SEO.  Search engine optimization pros check out Moz daily to see what’s happening in the space.

They also come to use their tools and resources to help them rank their sites and extend their visibility.

Rand Fishkin co-founded the site with Gillian Muessig, who happens to be his mother.   The two initially operated a web design shop and Rand had to learn SEO to promote the business.  He shared what he learned in SEO forums and quickly became known as an authority in the field.

Frustrated by the secretive world of SEO, they started SEOMoz in 2004 as a way to openly share the knowledge.  In fact, the Moz part of their name is a direct nod to the open-source sharing philosophy made famous by the Mozilla Foundation and Dmoz Web directory project.

These days the profitable blog and community simply go by Moz, and Fishkin jokingly refers to his title as “Wizard of Moz.”
Moz earned $42 million in 2016, primarily from its paid membership area, which offers valuable tools and services for the avid search engine marketers.

True to the name, Moz still offers numerous tools for free and even the membership area comes with a 30-day free trial.

#2.  Engadget

Founder – Peter Rojas
Income – $5,500,000 per month

We last saw Peter Rojas at #8 with Gizmodo and while that blog focuses on many topics, with Engadget, it’s all about tech.Peter Rojas runs two top earning blogs

Peter Rojas runs two top earning blogs

Rojas created Engadget to give sound advice and detailed reviews on technology and consumer electronics.  From the beginning, the site has employed numerous writers and editors to contribute to its content machine.

Engadget is now run by AOL, who acquired the blog in 2005.
The lesson here is if you ever want to sell your blog, it’s best if it is a brand on its own and not a personal brand.

The company earns massive revenue from advertising on the site.

#1.  HuffPost

Founder – Arianna Huffington
Income – $14,000,000 per month

Arianna Huffington is a top paid blogger

Arianna Huffington is a top paid bloggerIn 2005, Arianna Huffington launched the Huffington Post with the goal of becoming a political counterpart to the popular Drudge Report.  The blog provided a liberal view of politics and lifestyle and quickly gained a strong following.

The site has grown year after year and in 2011, Huffington sold the blog to AOL for $315,000.

Huffington received $21 million-plus stock options in the company as part of the sale and stayed on as Editor-in-Chief.  She resigned from that post in August 2016, and now devotes her time to a new startup Thrive Global, a health and wellness site.

The site has rebranded and is now known simply as HuffPost.

It is the #1 most popular political blog according to a study by eBizMBA.  Alexa Global, Compete and Quantcast.

The top-earning blog is an enormous success, earning $14,000,000 in revenue in 2016, and it is estimated to be worth $1 billion currently.

Sponsored advertising revenue provides the majority of HuffPost’s income.  The site provides banners and other ads across it’s variety of channels.

What do you think?

I hope this list shows you what is possible and inspires you to follow your own path to the top.

As always I would love to hear your thoughts.  Please leave a comment and let me know what you think

15 Top Earning Blogs Making Money Online Infographic

As always I would love to hear your thoughts.  Please leave a comment and let me know what you think

Most profitable blogsMost profitable blogs
Top Paid Bloggers

As always I would love to hear your thoughts.  Please leave a comment below.  What did you think?

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Source: incomist.com

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