How I Travel Full-Time By RV And Boat With My 2 Dogs

Traveling with a dog is a lot of fun, but there are some important things to consider so you and your pet are prepared. 

How I Travel Full-Time By RV And Boat With My 2 Dogs

How I Travel Full-Time By RV And Boat With My 2 DogsSometimes people think we are crazy for bringing our dogs on our adventures, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. For us, it’s like bringing your kids along, haha! 

Since we’ve been doing this for several years and in so many different ways, I figured I would be a good person to share what it’s like traveling with a dog for anyone who is interested in learning how it’s done.

You might be interested in going on a roadtrip with a dog. Maybe you want to sail or RV full-time with them, or perhaps you just want to take your furry companion on your next week long vacation. 

Whether you want to travel full-time with your pets, or if you want to just go on the occasional trip, hopefully my experiences will help you.

Traveling with a dog has been a huge learning process for me.

We’ve had to go slow and learn what works for our dogs. I say this because there is no single right way to travel with pets. So, you may have to adjust a little for your specific animal, as all animals are different and have different needs. We even see differences between our two dogs in how they travel.

Before I go on, let me backup a little bit. If you follow me on Instagram, then you already know this – I travel full-time with my two dogs. We’ve been traveling with them for years now, and they are pretty used to it whether we are in a tent, Jeep, RV, campervan, or sailboat.

Our dogs have been to several new countries, many new states, national and state parks, hiked some of the tallest mountains in the U.S., swam in beautiful Caribbean waters, and more.

We absolutely love our dogs, and we go to the extreme to make sure they are happy and comfortable with what we are doing.

While we love bringing our dogs everywhere with us, that does not mean it’s easy. Traveling with a dog takes some serious planning, and it is not something to take lightly.

Everything takes a little bit longer due to bathroom breaks, walks, and all the planning, so it definitely takes more effort.

I have received a ton of questions over the years on how we keep everyone happy, us and the dogs, while we travel. Of course, my experiences won’t apply to all dogs, as all dogs are different. But, hopefully you will find some ideas or tips that will make traveling with pets a little easier on everyone.

Content related to traveling with a dog:

 

traveling with dogs by boat

The four of us on SV Paradise (our boat)

About our dogs, Sailor and Mr. French.

Our bigger dog is Sailor, and she is about 85 pounds and is over 13 years old. Our smaller dog is Mr. French, and he is a 15-pound French Bulldog who is over 11 years old. We’ve had them since they were puppies (we adopted both of them) and love them so much!

Mr. French is happy to be wherever we are, and he doesn’t care much for being outside so he makes the perfect pet for an RV or boat. He enjoys sailing and likes to be right at the helm with us.

Sailor enjoys all of the smells when we travel to new places as well as the attention and petting from being a big dog at a campground, marina, or anchorage. Due to her bigger size, we have to do more to make sure she is comfortable and happy, but it is all worth it. She is a great hiking buddy and is very friendly and social with new people.

Honestly, while traveling with a dog is more work, I can’t imagine what it would be like to travel without them. They bring us so much happiness and love, so it is well worth it to us.

When traveling with a dog, here are my tips so that both the humans and animals are happy and healthy.

Here’s how to start traveling with a dog.

 

1. Take it slow when introducing your pets to travel.

If you want to start traveling with a dog, then I recommend taking it slow.

Whether you are going to live in a boat or an RV full time, or are just going on a weeklong road trip, I recommend slowly introducing your dog to travel.

This is the top tip we’ve heard from others who travel with their dogs, and it’s very true.

So, instead of throwing your pets into a long trip, you may want to start with something much smaller, so that they can get used to the process. You will be completely changing their routine, and many pets are used to following routines each day.

I also recommend trying to keep some of their routines as close to normal as possible, such as feeding times and when you let them out for exercise and bathroom breaks.

For example, when we started sailing, numerous people suggested starting the dogs out at a marina, then doing day sails, then an anchorage, and go from there. So, that’s exactly what we did. We didn’t want them to be afraid of sailing or make them afraid to get on the boat, so we took it as slow as possible. That’s worked out well for us, and we recently did a 9-day sail with them, and they acted like it was no big deal at all.

We got them very comfortable with being on the boat, and we haven’t had to quit just yet, so I would say it was a huge success.

If you are not planning on traveling full-time, but want to go on a road trip with your dog, I recommend not traveling too far at first, especially if they’re not used to being in the car. Slowly introducing them to travel is good so that they don’t get scared or stressed out. So, you may want to start by bringing them to a park nearby to help them with their nerves, as some dogs can be quite anxious!

 

traveling with dogs internationally

This is what a normal day on the water looks like.

2. Know the rules and customs of where you are going.

Not every place you go to will be pet friendly.

When traveling with a dog, you will quickly learn that not every park or trail is open to dogs. Most national parks are this way and don’t allow dogs on the trails.

However, there are some national parks that do. This is why I recommend doing some research ahead of time so that you are not surprised or frustrated when you get to your destination.

No matter where you are traveling with a dog, respect the land and the people there. You should always pick up after your dog, even if that means that you will have to hike for hours with a dog waste bag. You should not let your pets trample over delicate areas, and don’t let them approach people who don’t want to be bothered.

The same also applies to campgrounds and hotels. You will want to make sure that you find dog friendly camping, dog friendly hotels, and more. You’ll want to call in advance to make sure the weight and breed are acceptable.

 

3. How to do veterinarian visits.

Going to the vet is an important part of being a pet owner, and you still need to do it when you’re traveling with a dog.

I receive a lot of questions about how we handle this.

Our dogs still see the vet each year, and sometimes more often if there are any issues. They just usually see a new vet each year. If we’re in the same place for longer than a year, then they might see the same vet more than once.

Our dogs have never had an issue going to a new vet, and they go each time with no problem. We simply make sure to bring all of their paperwork with us so that there is no confusion as to what was done at a previous appointment.

When it comes to medications, we try to stock up on what we need for the whole year. 

If you’re going to start traveling with a dog, especially full-time here are some thing you’ll want to bring up with your vet to prepare:

  • Getting your dog microchipped. This is a great thing to have, and if you are going to a new country then it is usually mandatory.
  • Rabies vaccination – this is normal.
  • Seeing what vaccinations and medications are recommended or required in the area you will be traveling to in the next year. This can vary even state by state!

 

4. How to visit new countries with dogs.

When visiting new countries with our dogs, there have been a lot of steps and hurdles to go through.

Here are some of the preparations you may need to make when traveling with a dog to a foreign country:

  1. Contact the government veterinarian agency of the country you are seeking to visit and ask for an up-to-date list of requirements for bringing a pet.
  2. Bring your dog to a veterinarian where you are currently located and get all of the required shots, tests, paperwork, etc.
  3. Visit the USDA or the equivalent in the country you are in to get your paperwork certified and stamped.
  4. Send all of the required paperwork back to the government veterinarian in the country you are desiring to go to and have them approve it. You will also need to get a permit from them for your pet to enter the country.
  5. Then, once you get to the new country, you may have to bring your pet to the government vet so that they can make sure it is the same pet on the paperwork, as well as to make sure the pet is healthy.

Now, these aren’t the exact steps for every single country, as every country has its own process.

The process can take several months from beginning to end, so you will want to make sure that you budget for plenty of time to get everything ready. When you’re boating with dogs, especially around the Caribbean, you can spend a lot of time researching this kind of stuff.

You’ll want to make sure you follow the steps exactly as detailed by the country you are going to, because doing them out of order (such as getting the vaccinations in the wrong timeline) will invalidate the process. This can be a costly and timely mistake, but it’s avoidable.

When you’re traveling with a dog or another pet, I also recommend:

  • Try to bring as much food for your pet as you can. We usually bring several months of dog food with us, as there may not be as many choices where you are going.
  • Keep your dog on a leash when it is required, if there are people near, and so on. And, always follow the leash rules of the area you’re visiting. Not everyone in other countries and areas like dogs, so you will want to keep that in mind.
  • When you go to the vet, try to get any standard medications that you may need. For example, our bigger dog can sometimes have an ear issue that requires a liquid steroid that you insert in her ears. We always try to have at least one backup on us so we don’t have to try to find a vet, as it can be quite difficult in foreign countries to get your dog to a vet if you don’t have a car, and not all islands have a vet either.
  • In some countries and/or areas, you may have to keep your pet documents on you at all times as you may be asked to show it at random times.

While it is a lot of work to bring your dog to a new country, it is possible and most government vets are super nice and helpful.

Some helpful resources for more information on each specific country include:

 

Traveling with a dog in a van

Can you spot Mr. French?

5. How to keep a tiny area clean when traveling with pets.

We keep our home as clean as it can be, which usually means vacuuming every single day. Our bigger dog sheds a ton, and we would be choking on hair all day if we didn’t vacuum as much.

We use a Dyson vacuum (this is the one that we love) and it works great. It’s small, rechargeable, and super portable.

We bring this with us whether we’re on the van or in the boat. Highly, highly recommend.

 

6. How to keep the temperature comfortable in an RV or boat for a pet.

For us, we try to follow good weather as much as we can. However, I know that is not always possible.

There are devices where you can track the temperature over a cell signal back to wherever your dog is (you can find a whole bunch of them on Amazon), which can be a great option. However, you might not always have a signal.

If we are unable to make the temperature comfortable for our dogs or if the electrical power isn’t stable, we simply do not leave our dogs alone.

But, it usually isn’t hard to make it comfortable for them. By opening windows, turning on fans, or the AC, you can make it pretty comfortable for both humans and pets.

 

What do I need to travel with my dog?

Walking in Utah

7. Full-time travel with dogs – how they use the bathroom on the boat.

This is one of the most common questions we’re asked about traveling with a dog. People are fascinated with how our dogs go to the bathroom on our boat.

We always try to make regular and frequent bathroom breaks for our dogs.

Whether we are traveling by boat or car, we like to keep bathroom breaks as similar as possible.

We were nervous training our older dogs to use the bathroom on the boat, but it has been just fine. They only have to do this when we’re on an overnight sail, so it’s not very often. Keep in mind that 90% of the time you’re living on a boat is either at anchor or in a marina, so there is almost always land access.

When we look for a marina or an anchorage, we are always looking to see if there is a good area to let out the dogs. That may mean a beach, a grassy area, a dinghy dock so that we can walk to town with the dogs, and so on.

A lot of people falsely assume that when you’re sailing full-time, neither you or your pets touch land for years at a time, and that assumption just makes me laugh. Our dogs go to shore multiple times a day, except for when we are doing a long passage (which isn’t often).

Depending on where we are, we may have to take them for a short dinghy ride to shore or we’re at dock and can simply walk them off the boat to use the bathroom.

If we are doing a longer passage on our sailboat and there is no land for them to step their paws on, we do have fake grass on our boat that they are able to use. It doesn’t happen often though, and most of the time they still get walked 3-5 times a day even when we are on our sailboat.

 

8. How to keep dogs safe on a boat.

The longest sail that we have done with our dogs was 9 days, and they did extremely well on that sail.

Some of the things we do to make sure they are happy and safe include:

  • One of us is pretty much always keeping an eye on them. If we can’t pay close attention to them, then we put a leash on them or close off the inside area so they cannot fall overboard. (If you decide to leash your dog, please make sure they cannot fall off the boat and choke themselves. This applies to being on the boat, dock, land, etc. Sadly we know someone who had this happen to their dog and it had a very sad ending.)
  • We have life jackets for each dog, and we’ve tested them before bringing them out for sails.
  • At night, we keep everything closed off so that there are absolutely no worries with the dogs.
  • We make sure there is plenty of water, food, snacks, and snuggles.

We are lucky that our dogs are quite comfortable on the boat.

They don’t panic or bark.

They simply fall asleep and are relaxed when on the boat.

I think this ties back into #1 of this blog post – we slowly introduce them to new things. This has allowed them to be quite adaptable to any environment that they are put in, whether we are tent camping, roadtripping, in an RV, or on an overnight sail.

 

Traveling with dog tips

Testing out their new dog life jackets 

9. The items that make it easy for traveling with a dog.

We have a lot of items on the boat that are specifically for our dogs, and many of them come with us when we move to our camper van. Here are the most helpful items we have:

  • Dog ramp – This is for when we are at a fixed dock, where it’s a long hop from our transom to the dock. We had a plastic one for a little bit but we found that it would bend in the heat so we had to switch to something better. We are much happier with an aluminum ramp now.
  • Dog toys – To keep our dogs busy and happy, I like to put peanut butter in a Kong and give it to them as a nice treat.
  • Dog waste bags – We keep a plethora of these onboard our boat and van. We usually bulk buy a big box of around 1,000 bags. We also make sure they are biodegradable and compostable.
  • Help ‘Em Up Harness – This is the harness we have for our bigger dog, and I highly recommend it. We put it on her so that she can easily get in and out of steeper places. It’s a little pricey, but well worth it to make sure your dog is safe.
  • K9 SportSack – We use this for our smaller dog so that we can easily just carry him around. He’s not a huge fan of walking everywhere so putting him in the backpack makes it easier on everyone.
  • Collapsible bowl – We always keep one of these in our hiking bag so that the dogs always have something easy to drink out of.
  • Life jacket – If your dog is going to be on a boat, you’ll want a life jacket for them.

 

10. Getting exercise is still important.

Some people think that having a dog on a boat or in an RV is bad for the dog. I don’t think that could be further from the truth, though.

Our dogs get 3-5 walks (sometimes more) each and every single day.

Exercise is so important whether you’re camping with a dog, sailing with them, etc. Don’t assume you’ll fit in walks – you have to plan them in advance.

We always make sure to give our dogs a long walk at the start of the day if we know we’re going to have a long drive or sail. This way, we can try to tire them out and get rid of a lot of energy.

Taking them for a walk is one of the first things we do when we stop, and then we always fit in another long walk before bedtime. You may feel exhausted after a long day of sailing or traveling, but don’t forget how important exercise and routines are to your pets.

 

11. Have a traveling checklist.

Before you leave for wherever you’re going, I recommend bringing anything you think you’ll need, even if you don’t end up using it. This may include:

  • Pet food
  • Water and food bowls
  • Collars, leashes, harnesses
  • Dog waste bags
  • Treats
  • Blankets and beds
  • Medication
  • Paperwork

Specific pets may need different items, and go over your list before you leave. 

12. What about traveling with a dog on a plane?

I would be careful if you are wanting to fly places with your pets where they have to go in the cargo area, as it can be traumatizing to put them in the cargo area of a plane. It can be extremely hot, scary, and they will be away from you for quite some time.

I know several people who have moved to a new country and flew their dogs in cargo in order to make it possible to bring their pets. But, nearly all of these people have told me that they would never do it again, unless absolutely necessary.

If you are going on short trips by plane, I would not recommend putting your pets in cargo for that. Instead, if you have to bring your pet, I would simply find another way to travel. Or, you can find someone to watch your pet.

If your pet can sit with you on the plane, then that’s a whole different story. They may be just fine on the plane, but you should consult with a veterinarian if you have any questions. We’ve avoided flying with our dogs, so I’m just not as familiar with it.

 

Traveling with a dog

We rented a pontoon in Nevada several years ago with the dogs

Traveling with a dog – in summary

I hope you found today’s article helpful.

Please remember that I am not a pet expert, nor a veterinarian. I do have a lot of experience traveling with a dog, but all pets are different. They have different needs and personalities, and what works for my dogs may not work for yours.

So if you have any concerns about traveling with your pet, please contact your veterinarian.

Traveling with a dog can be extremely enjoyable, but there are a few more things you’ll have to think about.

If you’re anything like me, though, it will be well worth it and your pet will enjoy it as well!

Do you like to travel with your dogs? What other questions do you have for me about traveling with pets?

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Source: makingsenseofcents.com

7 Mistakes That Could Keep You From Selling Your Home This Winter

Selling a house during winter comes with its own unique challenges. Snow, for one, can bury your home’s best features. Your normally lush landscaping may look drab and lifeless. And truth be told, all you want to do is cozy up at home rather than welcome buyers through your door.

Still, if you’re game to sell during winter, it’s essential that you put on your snow pants and put some effort into making your house shine. To help, here are some classic mistakes to avoid once the temperature drops, and why they can make such a difference. Just avoid making these all-too-common winter-selling fumbles in order to get top dollar.

Mistake No. 1: Setting down the shovel

You cleared off enough of the driveway for your car, but potential buyers won’t be entering through the garage like you do.

“Blazing a path through 3 feet of virgin snow makes a lousy first impression,” says John Engel, a Realtor® with Halstead Properties, in New Canaan, CT.

Don’t put away your snow shovel until you’ve cleared a path to your front door. Or save your poor back by hiring a snow removal company to keep your paths walkable.

“Not only does it make it more inviting for buyers, but it avoids potential safety and liability concerns,” says Massachusetts Realtor John Ternullo.

Mistake No. 2: Giving in to the winter blahs

Gray skies and barren trees make winter a particularly depressing time to sell. But you don’t have to let your home look as doleful as the weather.

“Pops of color by the entryway, like a seasonal wreath and topiaries, can add some interest to the front entrance as well as make it more inviting,” Ternullo says.

And don’t wait until buyers schedule showings to add some life: Colorful curb appeal transforms your listing photos from drab to dramatic.

Mistake No. 4: Not scrubbing your windows

Colder temps have robbed your trees of their leaves, leaving your home to look a bit sadder in winter’s wake. But that’s not the only problem. Those full trees previously shielded your home from direct sunlight. And now that it’s pouring in your windows, potential buyers will be able to see everything. 

Scuffs, fingerprints, and streaks are “never more apparent” than in the wintertime, Engel says, so you should make sure you’re vigilant about keeping windows clean. Alone, that grime might not be enough to turn off a potential buyer, but it might make them wonder what other details you’ve missed.

Mistake No. 5: Displaying outdated summer photos

Your Tudor looks particularly glorious in the summer, but if your only listing photos were taken in April, buyers will immediately suspect a problem.

“Nothing says ‘old, tired listing’ more than the photo you took nine months ago,” Engel says. Talk to your Realtor about taking new photos that make your home look festive and seasonal. Feel free to keep older photos in the listing—your buyers might want to know what the home looks like when the gardens are in full bloom—but updated photos will make your listing seem fresh.

Mistake No. 6: Turning down the heat

Don't give potential buyers a chilly reception.
Don’t give potential buyers a chilly reception.

Olivier Le Moal/iStock

“Frugality is great, but not when you’re trying to sell real estate for top dollar,” says Brian Davis, a real estate investor and co-founder of SparkRental.com.

Turn the heat up before you leave for showings, your utility bill be damned. Stick to 68 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit to keep everyone comfy.

“It will make the house feel homier and more welcoming,” Davis says. “It also gives the impression that the house is energy-efficient and well-insulated.”

Mistake No. 7: Denying access

It’s New Year’s Eve and a buyer wants to stop by. How dare they! Shouldn’t they assume you have a fabulous party to prepare for?

Maybe. But if you want to sell your home in the off-season, the buyer has to come first. You’ll need to work with your Realtor to devise a strategy for squeezing in showings, even in between all of winter’s holiday events and family gatherings.

“While it may be inconvenient, it’s crucial not to deny showings, as that could be a missed opportunity,” Ternullo says. “There may be less buyers compared to spring, but winter buyers tend to be serious.”

Mistake No. 8: Leaving out your draft stoppers

Your hand-knit draft stopper might look adorable snuggled against your door, but it “sends a clear message to buyers,” Davis says. “This house is drafty and loses heat easily.”

Not that you should lie. But every home has hidden problems, and it’s best to let the buyers make their own assessments and discoveries during the inspection period. Don’t leave out little things that could sway their decision.

Source: realtor.com

Energy Ogre Review – How To Save $800+ A Year On Your Electricity Bill

I have partnered with Energy Ogre in this Energy Ogre review. All opinions are 100% my own. You can use Energy Ogre promo code MSOC to receive a free month of Energy Ogre service (the 13th month free).

Do you want to save money on your electricity bill?

If you live in Texas, then this article is for you!

Unfortunately, many households in Texas overpay for their monthly electricity bill.

But, that doesn’t mean you can’t change that.

There are plenty of ways to save money on electricity, and one of them is to use Energy Ogre.

Energy Ogre saves members $800 to $1,200 each year on average, so people are actually excited to get their electricity bill, instead of dreading it.

Energy Ogre shops the market for their members, and analyzes the available electricity plans from hundreds of providers, then selects the best one based on the member’s energy usage.

If you live in Texas, this is a really easy opportunity to save some extra money.

You can use Energy Ogre promo code MSOC to receive a free month of Energy Ogre service (the 13th month free).

What is Energy Ogre?

Energy Ogre is an electricity management company that monitors the market to make sure their members are on the best value electricity plan for their home. This gives their members access to the most affordable electricity plans.

Energy Ogre has helped thousands of homes, and the average Energy Ogre member saves over 40% on their electricity bills.

Energy Ogre saves you time and money, and I think that’s a no brainer!

They also have a free savings calculator that will tell you immediately how much money you will save, which I highly recommend. Just try it out to see if you can save any money.

You can sign up for Energy Ogre here.

How does Energy Ogre work?

Energy Ogre is super simple!

Once you sign up, they handle finding the best electricity provider for you, so that you can save the most money and have the best electricity plan for your household.

Then, they continually monitor your electricity contract to make sure that you have the lowest rate.

Luckily, in Texas you have the freedom and option to choose your electricity provider. However, many people don’t realize this or they think it’s too much of a hassle to switch. And, many times, most people simply don’t realize how much money that they could be saving each month!

How much is Energy Ogre?

Energy Ogre is a membership service that costs $10 a month, or $120 per year. This fee is separate from your electricity bill.

Even though Energy Ogre costs a little bit of money, you’ll most likely see great savings, as statistically most people are overpaying in Texas!

Remember, Energy Ogre saves members on average $800 to $1200 each year.

Is Energy Ogre legit?

Yes, Energy Ogre is paid for by members like you, instead of electricity companies. Since they are completely independent, you know that YOU are their focus.

Some of the tasks that Energy Ogre does include:

  • Energy Ogre monitors the electricity market to make sure you are always on the most affordable plan.
  • They receive custom, below-market rates to save you the most money.
  • They stay ahead of your renewals so that you are always getting the best pricing.
  • They provide tools to better manage your electricity consumption.

Yes, you could find your own electricity plan, but using Energy Ogre can save you a ton of time, and they know what they are doing. Energy Ogre reads all of the fine print, knows about all of the surprise fees, and they do all of the calculations for you.

So, you’ll be in good hands with Energy Ogre.

How can I cut my electricity bill?

If you want to cut your electricity costs even more, here are many other ideas that can help you save even more money:

  1. Instead of using your air conditioner, use fans. Fans use a lot less electricity than AC.
  2. Regularly change the filter on your AC or furnace.
  3. Unplugging unused electronics. Computers, TVs, chargers, and more all use power even when they’re turned off.
  4. Changing your heat or air conditioner temperature so that they turn on less often and use less power.
  5. Keeping your refrigerator doors closed, as it uses energy to cool it back down after you are done.
  6. Turning off lights around your home.
  7. Using a programmable thermostat. With a programmable thermostat, you can set the temperature at exactly what you want it to be for different times throughout the day. This way you don’t have to constantly change it as it will automatically change on a set schedule.
  8. And of course, sign up for Energy Ogre!

If you live in Texas, Energy Ogre can help you save hundreds of dollars a year.

You can use Energy Ogre promo code MSOC to receive a free month of Energy Ogre service (the 13th month free).

What do you do to save on your electricity bill each month? How much is your monthly bill usually?

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Source: makingsenseofcents.com

13 Cold Weather Tips and Tricks

If your waterproof boots have sprung a leak, or your car doors keep freezing solid, don’t worry. We’ve gathered solutions for those and for 11 other cold weather problems you might have this winter. 

By

Bruce and Jeanne Lubin
October 14, 2020

vanilla extract on your furnace’s filter. Your house’s heating system will do the rest of the work for you. To scent one particular area, take a small jar and place several cotton balls inside. Dab a few drops of vanilla extract onto the cotton balls. Before putting the cover on the jar, use a nail to puncture a few holes into it for your very own vanilla air freshener.

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Make it spicy

To easily deodorize your kitchen, put a cinnamon stick and other favorite spices (such as cloves or ginger) in a mug of water, and microwave it for 2 minutes. Remove the mug and set it on the counter so that the aroma can fill the kitchen. This trick is great for winter, when the scent of the spices will create a warm, cozy atmosphere.

Seal the door

Have a sliding glass door that’s rarely used during the winter? Seal it with duct tape to keep cold air from coming in.

SEE ALSO:  Domestic CEO’s How to Make Your Home (and Everything in it) Smell Good

Outdoors

Winterize deck furniture

To keep your metal deck furniture free from rust and wear all winter long, reach for the petroleum jelly Just apply a thin layer (especially in areas where the furniture tends to rust) after cleaning the surface with simple soap and water.

Ease painful pads on pets

Many dogs love to play outside in the snow, but their paws can cause them pain if ice starts to build up between their pads. Before heading out for a winter walk, rub some petroleum jelly between each pad. The ice will stay away and your dog can enjoy the outdoors! If your poor pet’s pads are already cracked or dry, gently rub a little petroleum jelly into her pads while she’s sleeping.

Petroleum jelly is completely safe if your pet decides she wants to lick it off later.

Spray on a little D-fense.

Spray WD-40 in the lining of car doors. Doing this once in the beginning of the winter should keep your doors opening easily.

Baby powder to the rescue

Use baby powder or baking soda to absorb the moisture that collects on the rubber seal lining of your car door. Just wipe the weather strip with a dry cloth before sprinkling on the powder. Repeat every few days in the dead of winter to make sure you can always get into your car.

RELATED: Who Knew’s 7 Car Hacks for Winter Weather

Easy undercarriage cleaning

Don’t forget to clean under your car, especially if you live in an area where salt and ice assault in winter.

A trick for these hard-to-reach areas: Run a lawn sprinkler underneath the car and drive back and forth.

Block the lock

To keep your car’s door locks safe from ice during the cold winter months, place a refrigerator magnet over the lock. You can even take an old magnet (last year’s calendar from a local realtor, perhaps) and cut it into pieces that fit perfectly.

Personal Care

Brush to better lips

For lips that need a little extra TLC, especially in the winter, try this effective scrub. Mix together 2 teaspoons baking soda with enough lemon juice to make a paste. Gently scrub the mixture over your lips with a dry toothbrush for a minute or two, then rinse, and apply some petroleum jelly or your favorite lip balm.

Go crazy for cranberry

For a seasonal solution to chapped winter lips—and a great DIY gift idea for the holidays—try this cranberry lip balm! In a microwave-safe bowl, mix together 1 tablespoon avocado or almond oil, 10 fresh cranberries, 1 teaspoon honey, and 1 drop vitamin E oil (from a capsule). Microwave on high until the mixture begins to boil. Remove carefully as the bowl may be hot. Mash the berries with a fork and stir well to combine. After the mixture has cooled for 10 minutes, strain it into a small portable tin, making sure to remove all of the fruit pieces. Cool completely. You’ve made your own great-smelling lip balm!

Sweater cryogenics

If your favorite cashmere or angora sweater is looking a little worn, put it in a plastic bag and place it in the freezer for half an hour. The cold causes the fibers to expand, making your sweater look new again! Who knew there was such a thing as sweater cryogenics?

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Your warmest boots

Make your winter boots a little warmer—and make sure they’re completely waterproof—by lining the bottom of the insides with duct tape. The tape will create a waterproof seal, and the shiny silver will reflect your body heat back onto your feet.