10 Free Holiday Activities for Couples Paying off Debt

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure for more information.

This is where it all started guys. On a quiet summer afternoon I hit publish on my first post titled 10 Free Activities for Couples Paying off Debt and the rest is history. I thought it fitting to do one for the winter as well, seeing how we spend more money this time of year than any other.

1. Christmas Lights Home Tour

Every city has a neighborhood that really goes all out with the lights. Take a drive to look at them or walk if the weather isn’t frightful. In Florida, the weather is always great this time of year so we have a biking group that does a huge ride through the neighborhoods and ends back at a bar for beers.

You can make a trip out of it too. A city near us was featured on TV for their light displays so I’m looking forward to seeing it this year. Sometimes houses do the same thing every year so it’s fun to switch it up from time to time.

2. Holiday Movie Night

Put on your pajamas and pour the cocoa, there’s nothing better than a Christmas movie! While I’m partial to all holiday Claymation movies I loved the resurgence of quality seasonal cinema of the early 2000’s. For those with Netflix (or borrowing from a friend) here’s a list of movies for your viewing pleasure.

If you don’t have Netflix, channels like NBC, ABC, Freeform, etc always have a good variety (I’m judging you if you even try to add Hallmark Channel movies to that list.)

3. School Holiday Production

Elementary schools always have some type of performance with oodles of cute awkward kids singing carols and dressed like elves. The best part, these events are usually free. If you don’t have friends with kids that can keep you in the loop find some teacher friends with connections. They’ll know when all the good shows are. But word to the wise, don’t do this one if you look like these guys:

Do the Creep

Do the Creep

4. Live Nativity

These things can range from “plastic baby in a manger” to “drive-through re-creation of the gospels.” Even if you get a bad one there’s usually hot cocoa and cookies at the end so you win either way. The good ones really do bring the Christmas story to life and it’s a pretty cool experience. I highly recommend it.

5. Star Gaze

Winter is a great time for star gazing. Taurus, Perseus, and Gemini are some of the constellations you can find in the winter sky. Yes, I did Google that, so even if you’re not a budding astronomer who doesn’t enjoy looking at shiny things in the sky?

Download an app like SkyView Free and find all the starry patterns. If you’re lucky enough to live by a planetarium see if they do free shows. Ours does two every Friday that the college is in session.

6. Holiday Parade

Was anybody else in marching band? I was and it was absolutely for the parades. There are a lot in December! We have our pick of morning or evening throughout the month. And since we live near the water we even have a few lighted boat parades! Check your cities events calendar and cities around you to fill your weekends with candy canes and Santas!

7. Photo with Santa

Speaking of Santa, how ridiculous are the prices for photos with Santa these days!? I don’t even have kids and I feel like I need to start putting away for their Santa pictures fund. That was until I found out about Bass Pro Shop’s annual Santa’s Wonderland. On select days you can get a free personalized photo with Santa, free wooden picture frame, free crafts for the kids, and more!

And even if you don’t have kids you should definitely put on your tackiest Christmas sweaters and make this years’ card something the family will be talking about til next year. Why not? It’s free!

8. Volunteer

I included this in my last list but the opportunities for giving this time of year are too numerous not to share again. Aside from soup kitchens and caroling you can hand out Christmas cards at Hospice, collect cans of food from your pantry to give to a shelter, or connect with your local foster care licensing agency to help out a foster family in need. Your money is valuable but your time is just as needed.

9. Go Outside

This is the obligatory “make a snow angel or sled down a hill” spot. But I live in Florida so I don’t know how to do that stuff. Whether you’re in blizzard country or it’s a balmy 70 degrees outside (sorry not sorry) get your butt outside and experience the free entertainment mother nature has to offer. I for one love walks downtown during the day and bonfires with s’more at night.

10. Stay Inside

Okay, outside not your thing? Stay inside… if you know what I mean. When’s the last time you pretended you were on your honeymoon or your favorite vacation with your significant other? There’s never a good time to put on those nighties from your lingerie shower so make the time! Get romantic and see what happens. Hey, it’s free. ?

Any other ideas for free activities this time of year? I’m always looking for new things to try and include in new posts!

Free Activities for Couples

Free Activities for Couples

<img data-attachment-id="4968" data-permalink="https://www.modernfrugality.com/save-money-online/mf-10-free-winter-activities-for-couples-paying-off-debt/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/MF-10-Free-Winter-Activities-for-Couples-Paying-Off-Debt.png?fit=735%2C1102&ssl=1" data-orig-size="735,1102" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"0"}" data-image-title="Want to get out of the house this winter without spending an arm and a leg?" data-image-description="

If you want to get out of the house this winter, check out these activities! 10 Free winter activities for couples paying off debt. You don’t have to spend an arm and a leg every single time you leave the house. #freewinteractivities #freeactivitiesforcouples #freewinteractivitiesforcouples #cheapactivities

” data-medium-file=”https://i0.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/MF-10-Free-Winter-Activities-for-Couples-Paying-Off-Debt.png?fit=200%2C300&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i0.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/MF-10-Free-Winter-Activities-for-Couples-Paying-Off-Debt.png?fit=400%2C600&ssl=1″ loading=”lazy” width=”400″ height=”600″ data-pin-title=”Want to get out of the house this winter without spending an arm and a leg?” data-pin-description=”If you want to get out of the house this winter, check out these activities! 10 Free winter activities for couples paying off debt. You don’t have to spend an arm and a leg every single time you leave the house. #freewinteractivities #freeactivitiesforcouples #freewinteractivitiesforcouples #cheapactivities” src=”https://bariatrx.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/10-free-holiday-activities-for-couples-paying-off-debt-1.png” alt class=”wp-image-4968″ srcset=”https://bariatrx.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/10-free-holiday-activities-for-couples-paying-off-debt-1.png 400w, https://i0.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/MF-10-Free-Winter-Activities-for-Couples-Paying-Off-Debt.png?resize=200%2C300&ssl=1 200w, https://i0.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/MF-10-Free-Winter-Activities-for-Couples-Paying-Off-Debt.png?w=735&ssl=1 735w” sizes=”(max-width: 400px) 100vw, 400px” data-recalc-dims=”1″>

I

Jen Smith is a personal finance expert, founder of Modern Frugality and co-host of the Frugal Friends Podcast. Her work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Lifehacker, Money Magazine, U.S. News and World Report, Business Insider, and more. She’s passionate about helping people gain control of their spending.

Source: modernfrugality.com

7 Mistakes That Could Keep You From Selling Your Home This Winter

Selling a house during winter comes with its own unique challenges. Snow, for one, can bury your home’s best features. Your normally lush landscaping may look drab and lifeless. And truth be told, all you want to do is cozy up at home rather than welcome buyers through your door.

Still, if you’re game to sell during winter, it’s essential that you put on your snow pants and put some effort into making your house shine. To help, here are some classic mistakes to avoid once the temperature drops, and why they can make such a difference. Just avoid making these all-too-common winter-selling fumbles in order to get top dollar.

Mistake No. 1: Setting down the shovel

You cleared off enough of the driveway for your car, but potential buyers won’t be entering through the garage like you do.

“Blazing a path through 3 feet of virgin snow makes a lousy first impression,” says John Engel, a Realtor® with Halstead Properties, in New Canaan, CT.

Don’t put away your snow shovel until you’ve cleared a path to your front door. Or save your poor back by hiring a snow removal company to keep your paths walkable.

“Not only does it make it more inviting for buyers, but it avoids potential safety and liability concerns,” says Massachusetts Realtor John Ternullo.

Mistake No. 2: Giving in to the winter blahs

Gray skies and barren trees make winter a particularly depressing time to sell. But you don’t have to let your home look as doleful as the weather.

“Pops of color by the entryway, like a seasonal wreath and topiaries, can add some interest to the front entrance as well as make it more inviting,” Ternullo says.

And don’t wait until buyers schedule showings to add some life: Colorful curb appeal transforms your listing photos from drab to dramatic.

Mistake No. 4: Not scrubbing your windows

Colder temps have robbed your trees of their leaves, leaving your home to look a bit sadder in winter’s wake. But that’s not the only problem. Those full trees previously shielded your home from direct sunlight. And now that it’s pouring in your windows, potential buyers will be able to see everything. 

Scuffs, fingerprints, and streaks are “never more apparent” than in the wintertime, Engel says, so you should make sure you’re vigilant about keeping windows clean. Alone, that grime might not be enough to turn off a potential buyer, but it might make them wonder what other details you’ve missed.

Mistake No. 5: Displaying outdated summer photos

Your Tudor looks particularly glorious in the summer, but if your only listing photos were taken in April, buyers will immediately suspect a problem.

“Nothing says ‘old, tired listing’ more than the photo you took nine months ago,” Engel says. Talk to your Realtor about taking new photos that make your home look festive and seasonal. Feel free to keep older photos in the listing—your buyers might want to know what the home looks like when the gardens are in full bloom—but updated photos will make your listing seem fresh.

Mistake No. 6: Turning down the heat

Don't give potential buyers a chilly reception.
Don’t give potential buyers a chilly reception.

Olivier Le Moal/iStock

“Frugality is great, but not when you’re trying to sell real estate for top dollar,” says Brian Davis, a real estate investor and co-founder of SparkRental.com.

Turn the heat up before you leave for showings, your utility bill be damned. Stick to 68 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit to keep everyone comfy.

“It will make the house feel homier and more welcoming,” Davis says. “It also gives the impression that the house is energy-efficient and well-insulated.”

Mistake No. 7: Denying access

It’s New Year’s Eve and a buyer wants to stop by. How dare they! Shouldn’t they assume you have a fabulous party to prepare for?

Maybe. But if you want to sell your home in the off-season, the buyer has to come first. You’ll need to work with your Realtor to devise a strategy for squeezing in showings, even in between all of winter’s holiday events and family gatherings.

“While it may be inconvenient, it’s crucial not to deny showings, as that could be a missed opportunity,” Ternullo says. “There may be less buyers compared to spring, but winter buyers tend to be serious.”

Mistake No. 8: Leaving out your draft stoppers

Your hand-knit draft stopper might look adorable snuggled against your door, but it “sends a clear message to buyers,” Davis says. “This house is drafty and loses heat easily.”

Not that you should lie. But every home has hidden problems, and it’s best to let the buyers make their own assessments and discoveries during the inspection period. Don’t leave out little things that could sway their decision.

Source: realtor.com

5 Sacrifices to Help You Max Out Your Retirement Account Next Year

Are you at the point where you’re ready to invest more in retirement each month but aren’t quite sure how? Maybe you want to increase your savings rate but the numbers don’t add up. I’ve always said that saving something is better than nothing. If you can’t max out savings like your retirement account, it’s not a big deal and you can always work your way up to this goal year after year. We’ve put together 5 sacrifices to max out your retirement account.

Right now, the maximum contribution limits for a 401(k) is $19,000 and $6,000 a traditional or Roth IRA. This year, I was finally able to max out my retirement account contributions for the first time. I know how it seems like you’d have to fork over a lot of money each year to do the same thing, and that’s because you will. However, you can save enough to max out your retirement for the year and still live a comfortable life.

You may have to make some sacrifices, but they may not produce super drastic changes to your budget or your lifestyle. Here are 5 reasonable sacrifices to help max out your retirement account next year and every year afterward.

Your Car

One thing that you can sacrifice to help you max out your retirement account is your car. While you can probably save a ton of money by not having a car especially if you live in a big city, you don’t have to give up owning a car completely. My husband and I both drive older paid-off cars and we love it. With the average car payment hovering around $400 to $500 per month, that’s a lot of money to fork over each month just to drive.

In fact, $500 per month is all you need to max out an IRA right now since the annual contribution limit for anyone under 50 is $6,000. Since cars depreciate in value so much, it often doesn’t make financial sense to buy a brand new car. Used cars can be paid off quicker and you may even be able to buy a decent used car in cash. From there, you can use that money that you would save by not having a car loan and put it toward retirement savings.

 Here are 5 reasonable sacrifices to help max out your retirement account . Click To Tweet

Live in a Smaller Home

My husband and I are sacrificing our dream home right now and I’m totally fine with that. We bought our first home a few years ago when we were 26 and 29 years old. It’s a nice starter home and it’s small. We don’t even have a basement but our family size is small right now so it’s fine. By having a smaller home and making it work, we save a ton of money on our mortgage, maintenance, repairs, and cleaning.

Now, would I love to have more space, walk-in closets or an extra enclosed room to serve as my office? Sure, but it’s not killing me that we live in a 1,300 sq ft home and instead I’m choosing to focus on what I love and enjoy about our home. I love how we have an extra bathroom and a nice fireplace in the family. We always have a decent-sized yard with a wrap-around deck and garden boxes that were already set up when we moved. Even though we are technically ‘sacrificing’ our dream home right now, I know that we will buy it later down the line and I’m content with where we’re at now.

RELATED: 6+ Easy Ways to Save Thousands on Home Repair

Frugal Travel

Some people give up traveling to pay off debt and save more. You don’t have to do this even if you’re willing to make sacrifices to max out your retirement next year. Instead of giving up travel altogether, find ways to make it more affordable so you can go on trips, and still invest generously. This is why I love frugality. Being frugal allows you to get creative and use the resources available to spend wisely on your values and save where you can.

Instead of paying for flights full price, you can wait for sales or sign up for a rewards credit card. Instead of spending tons of money on a hotel, see if you can stay with a friend or relative when you travel or book an Airbnb. Usually, when I travel, I’m not super picky about where I stay so long as it’s clean. I also plan to cook some meals if possible if our accommodations allow it.

I’ll usually book an Airbnb or a suite with full kitchen access so I can prepare breakfast and snacks. You don’t have to dine out for all 3 meals when you travel and breakfast is one of the easiest meals to prepare whether you have full access to a kitchen or not.

RELATED: How to Plan for Budget Travel This Year

Delay Your Gratification

We live in a society where people want everything fast and right now. This often leads to getting items and services before you can pay for them in full. If you want to avoid debt and living above your means, practice delayed gratification regularly and budget for larger purchases instead of financing them.

My husband and I used to have a ton of credit card debt, student loans, personal loans, and car loans. This debt really ate into our disposable income. Even after paying it off, I’ve still been tempted to finance things like furniture and other purchases. I choose not to and to delay my gratification. By simply waiting and planning, I save a lot of money and do a better job of committing to live below my means.

When you slow down on financing purchases and making impulse buys regularly, you’ll find that your budget is not so tight. You may even wind up with thousands extra each year that you can invest.

Your Time

Time is not a renewable asset. Once you use your time, it’s gone. You can never go back or relive a day where you wasted time. Keep this in mind when considering sacrifices to max out your retirement account. However, it should also be motivation to make good use of your time especially when it comes to working and earning extra money. If you’re looking to start maxing out your retirement account, odds are you’re still earning an active income where you’re trading time for money. If you want to earn more or increase your savings rate, you may have to get a second job or a side hustle.

Even if you want to establish a passive stream of income, you’ll need to dedicate time or energy to get that idea off the ground. Of course, sacrificing your time to work is not a waste. You can even make the most of your effort by choosing work that is enjoyable and fulfilling. Or start a side business where you can do things you love and still make good money.

Try to stick to your budget and save your money wisely to make it all worth it in the end. Pay yourself first consistently and remain dedicated to your goal in order to max out your retirement next year and each year afterward.

Source: everythingfinanceblog.com

Netflix Prices Have Gone Up: 5 Netflix Alternatives For You To Try

A week or so ago Netflix announced that they would be raising their prices on all of their streaming and DVD rental plans.

There was a bit of an outcry throughout the internet with people talking about how they were going to cancel or drop part of their package to reduce costs.  Nobody likes to pay for more for a service that they’ve been signed up for and using for such a long time.

It’s understandable to not want to pay more, but what are your alternatives if you don’t want to pay for Netflix anymore?

Today I thought I’d look at how the Netflix pricing is changing, and what entertainment alternatives you have to replace them.

[embedded content]

Quick Navigation

Netflix Prices Going Up

In their announcement that prices were changing Netflix told how pricing was changing, and what was going to be available for plans going forward.  You can either do streaming only or DVD only.

Here is their new pricing.

Netflix Price Increase

Netflix Price Increase

Netflix Streaming Plans

  • Basic – Streaming video only – 1 screen at a time: $8.99
  • Standard – Streaming video only – 2 screens at a time + HD: $12.99
  • Premium – Streaming video only – 4 screens at a time + Ultra HD: $15.99

Netflix DVD Plans

  • Standard – 1 DVD at a time: $7.99
  • Premier – 2 DVD at a time: $11.99
  • Standard – 1 HD Blu-ray at a time: $9.99
  • Premier – 2 HD Blu-ray at a time: $14.99

For most people who had basic streaming the pricing is going from $7.99 to $8.99/month.  So a price jump of about $1.  The other streaming plans went up by $2.

To find out if you think your plan is still a good value even with the price jump, check out our post: Is Netflix A Cost Efficient Entertainment Option For You?

Netflix Alternatives

Netflix Price Increase - Alternative Services

Netflix Price Increase - Alternative Services

With a lot of people talking about canceling Netflix or moving to another provider, just what other streaming and DVD providers are there out there?  Here’s a quick rundown of some of the more visible options.

Redbox DVD & Game Kiosks

Redbox Kiosks are located at a variety of gas stations, department stores, grocery stores and restaurants all over the United States.  You can rent any new release or classic movie from the kiosk for $1.75/night plus tax. They also have video games and Blu-Ray movies for slightly more.  If you try hard you can also find codes for free rentals at the Redbox kiosks, although those are becoming harder to find.  Still, $1.75 per movie is an affordable option, especially if you’re close to a Redbox location like we are.

Pluto TV

Pluto TV has an app for most streaming devices that allow you to watch a 100+ channels of free video entertainment from movies and music to TV shows.  Pluto is the free TV streaming service, but it feels like a premium product. They also have some free streaming movies available to watch, although you do have to watch commercials.

Amazon Instant Video

Amazon launched a video streaming service a few years back. The best part?  It’s free for all Amazon Prime members.  So if you’re already a member of Amazon Prime’s unlimited free or reduced price shipping on the site, you’ll get the video streaming service for free (not if you’re on one of the free Prime memberships for students or parents, however). The cost?  $119/year for Amazon Prime, or about $9.92/month.  Not too bad, especially when you also get all the benefits of 2 day shipping on all Amazon items.

The only downside that I’ve found is that they only have a fraction of the titles available on Netflix, so options aren’t as varied and some more popular and new release movies may not be available.

In addition to their Amazon Instant Video streaming options you can also purchase or rent selected movies and TV shows via Video On Demand.  Rentals start at about $3.99, and movie purchases cost $9.99 or more.

HBO Now

HBO programming has only been available via a cable TV package for the longest time.  Since 2015 HBO Now has provided HBO programming outside of a cable package.

If you’re a fan of certain HBO shows this makes cutting the cord much more possible. You can get HBO Now for $14.99/month.

Hulu

Another alternative, especially for folks who like to watch a lot of TV and classic movies is Hulu.  It costs $7.99/month and you can stream the video content to a variety of connected devices including Xbox and Playstation consoles, Fire TV, Rokue, as well some Blu-Ray players and TVs.

If you want to get a little more down and dirty, you can set up a streaming video solution like we have at our house using a Playon Media Server.

Philo TV

Philo is quickly becoming the go to option for people who don’t want to pay a lot for cable TV, and don’t care about sports (they don’t carry sports or major news networks, making it much cheaper).

They are only $16/month for their basic cable package, with 40+ channels from Discovery, TLC and History to HGTV.  Add 10+ more channels for only $20!

Read the full Philo review here.

There Are Other Options, But Are Any Better?

As you can see from the list above there are several other options of video rental services to use instead of Netflix if you aren’t happy with the price increases, but the question remains – are any of them better or more affordable options than Netflix?

Even after the price change I still think that Netflix offers a pretty good value in comparison to the other sites and video rental services.  It still costs less than a full cable TV package, and their streaming options, while still only being OK – are still ahead of most other sites offering the service.

Can you find cheaper options? Maybe, but their combination of ease of use, DVDs and streaming, leave them hard to beat still in my opinion.

Right now we’ll probably continue on with our streaming plan and pay the extra money just because we’ve been pretty happy with the service.

How about you – are you cancelling your Netflix plan, and if so are you going to be using something else instead?  Tell us your thoughts on the price increase, and about what alternatives you might be likely to try.

Source: biblemoneymatters.com

Which Student Loan Should You Pay First?

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure for more information.

The financial camps are divided between paying off your smallest first vs. your highest interest student loan. So who’s right?

Finance people can agree on a few things. Some debts like payday loans and IRS back taxes are worse than others and ideally, you should get rid of all debt that keeps you from having a positive net worth.

But how do you decide what goes first? This is something I stressed over when we started out. I had a large high-interest student and a small low-interest car loan while my husband had a moderate student loan with moderate interest. A total conundrum.

Also read: Is Being Debt Free Worth it?

So if you’re struggling to figure out where to start here’s a look at my theoretical friend and her theoretical $60,000 of student loan debt. She took out federal and private loans and doesn’t have a career that qualifies her for any student loan forgiveness. (Or this could be a couple’s student loans combined, however you want to look at it.)

Her theoretical student loans are:

a. $20,000 @ 4% interest with minimum payment of $150 p/m
b. $40,000 @ 6.5% interest with minimum payment of $300 p/m

I wanted to keep monthly payments as similar as possible so I adjusted the number of months for payment of the first loan accordingly keeping the total repayment for both at 36 months.

Pay off the Smallest Loan First

a. $1574.60 per month for 13 months. Total interest paid= $469.77
+$300 p/m for the minimum payment of other loan= $1874.60 total monthly payment for first 13 months.

b. After 13 months of minimum payments, the balance is now $38,879.74 with $2,780.72 of interest paid during this time.
The new monthly payment becomes $1,802.44 for 23 months and we end with $2,577.18 more in interest paid.

Total interest paid over 36 months: $5,827.67

Pay off the Highest Interest Loan First

b. $1653.49 per month for 26 months. Total interest paid= $1,803.49
+$150 p/m for the minimum payment of other loan= $1,803.49 total monthly payment for first 26 months.

a. After 26 months of minimum payments, the balance is now $17,763.60 with $1,641.55 of interest paid during this time.
The new monthly payment becomes $1,809.03 for 10 months and we end with $327.28 more in interest paid.

Total interest paid over 36 months: $4,959.65

Difference= $868.02 saved by tackling higher interest loan first.

To compare, I calculated paying both at the same time.
Monthly Payment= $1,816.44 for 36 months
Total Interest Paid= $5,391.83 Less than option 1, more than option 2

I then further calculated to see what the difference would be if my friend paid off her loans in 5 or 10 years:

5 years= $9,058.59 in interest paid (There’s that car she just financed)

10 years= $18,801.86 in interest paid (There’s that down payment on a house she said she couldn’t afford!)

The moral of the story is that if $800 keeps you up at night you should pay off higher interest loans first, especially if they’re big behemoths.

But if $18,000 keeps you up at night you need to get out of bed and start hustling.

Paying $1800 a month on student loans looks like a big number but maybe your loan is smaller, maybe you have the means to move in with more roommates or cut the cable and eating out.

Also Read: How to Make Paying off Debt not Suck

If you have smaller loans within your student loan pay those off in order of smallest to largest or break it down into milestones. Rewarding yourself with attainable benchmarks will help keep you motivated.

Whatever it is it’s time to start looking into the future and think about what you want to be doing with your money instead of giving it to the bank. Because the one thing everyone in the world can agree on is that it’s not fun to give away your money to banks when you don’t have to.

<img data-attachment-id="1309" data-permalink="https://www.modernfrugality.com/smallest-amount-or-highest-interest-student-loan/which-loan-first/" data-orig-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Which-Loan-First-e1501605428219.png?fit=400%2C693&ssl=1" data-orig-size="400,693" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"0"}" data-image-title="Which debt should I pay off first?" data-image-description="

Which debt should I pay off first?

” data-medium-file=”https://i1.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Which-Loan-First-e1501605428219.png?fit=173%2C300&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i1.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Which-Loan-First-e1501605428219.png?fit=346%2C600&ssl=1″ loading=”lazy” data-pin-description=”If you are in the midst of paying off a ton of student loans, read this. All of the inoformation on the debt snowball and the debt avalanche so you can decide which way works for you! #debtpayofftips #debtsnowballtips #debtavalanchetips #moneytipsformillennials” data-pin-title=”Should you go debt snowball or debt avalanche for student loans?” class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-1309 jetpack-lazy-image” src=”https://bariatrx.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/which-student-loan-should-you-pay-first.png” alt=”Choosing which debt to pay off first was so stressful! This article really put it into perspective.” width=”400″ height=”693″ data-recalc-dims=”1″ srcset=”data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAIAAAAAAAP///yH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAIBRAA7″>

<img data-attachment-id="1309" data-permalink="https://www.modernfrugality.com/smallest-amount-or-highest-interest-student-loan/which-loan-first/" data-orig-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Which-Loan-First-e1501605428219.png?fit=400%2C693&ssl=1" data-orig-size="400,693" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"0"}" data-image-title="Which debt should I pay off first?" data-image-description="

Which debt should I pay off first?

” data-medium-file=”https://i1.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Which-Loan-First-e1501605428219.png?fit=173%2C300&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i1.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Which-Loan-First-e1501605428219.png?fit=346%2C600&ssl=1″ loading=”lazy” data-pin-description=”If you are in the midst of paying off a ton of student loans, read this. All of the inoformation on the debt snowball and the debt avalanche so you can decide which way works for you! #debtpayofftips #debtsnowballtips #debtavalanchetips #moneytipsformillennials” data-pin-title=”Should you go debt snowball or debt avalanche for student loans?” class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-1309″ src=”https://bariatrx.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/which-student-loan-should-you-pay-first.png” alt=”Choosing which debt to pay off first was so stressful! This article really put it into perspective.” width=”400″ height=”693″ data-recalc-dims=”1″>

<img data-attachment-id="4998" data-permalink="https://www.modernfrugality.com/smallest-amount-or-highest-interest-student-loan/mf-which-student-loan-should-you-payoff-first_-highest-interest-rate-or-largest-balance__/" data-orig-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/MF-Which-Student-Loan-Should-You-Payoff-First_-Highest-Interest-Rate-or-Largest-Balance__.jpg?fit=735%2C1102&ssl=1" data-orig-size="735,1102" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"1"}" data-image-title="Should you go debt snowball or debt avalanche for student loans?" data-image-description="

If you are in the midst of paying off a ton of student loans, read this. All of the inoformation on the debt snowball and the debt avalanche so you can decide which way works for you! #debtpayofftips #debtsnowballtips #debtavalanchetips #moneytipsformillennials

” data-medium-file=”https://i2.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/MF-Which-Student-Loan-Should-You-Payoff-First_-Highest-Interest-Rate-or-Largest-Balance__.jpg?fit=200%2C300&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i2.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/MF-Which-Student-Loan-Should-You-Payoff-First_-Highest-Interest-Rate-or-Largest-Balance__.jpg?fit=400%2C600&ssl=1″ loading=”lazy” width=”400″ height=”600″ data-pin-title=”Should you go debt snowball or debt avalanche for student loans?” data-pin-description=”If you are in the midst of paying off a ton of student loans, read this. All of the inoformation on the debt snowball and the debt avalanche so you can decide which way works for you! #debtpayofftips #debtsnowballtips #debtavalanchetips #moneytipsformillennials” src=”https://bariatrx.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/which-student-loan-should-you-pay-first.jpg” alt class=”wp-image-4998″ srcset=”https://bariatrx.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/which-student-loan-should-you-pay-first.jpg 400w, https://i2.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/MF-Which-Student-Loan-Should-You-Payoff-First_-Highest-Interest-Rate-or-Largest-Balance__.jpg?resize=200%2C300&ssl=1 200w, https://i2.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/MF-Which-Student-Loan-Should-You-Payoff-First_-Highest-Interest-Rate-or-Largest-Balance__.jpg?w=735&ssl=1 735w” sizes=”(max-width: 400px) 100vw, 400px” data-recalc-dims=”1″>

Jen Smith is a personal finance expert, founder of Modern Frugality and co-host of the Frugal Friends Podcast. Her work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Lifehacker, Money Magazine, U.S. News and World Report, Business Insider, and more. She’s passionate about helping people gain control of their spending.

Source: modernfrugality.com

How We Paid Off Over $45K of Debt in 11 Months

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure for more information.

It seems pretty normal to me now but people still drop their jaws when I tell them we’ve paid over $45K on our loans in less than a year.

We still have a year to go and most days I have mixed emotions of accomplishment for what we’ve done vs. annoyance for how far we have to go.

UPDATE: As of August 31, 2017, Travis and I are STUDENT LOAN FREE! We paid off $77,646.54 in 23 months!

We’ve made conscious decisions to hold off on things like buying a house, going on trips, and even getting a couch that’s not covered in stains (all attempts to clean only make it worse.)

I didn’t agree to this at first but over time I’ve learned it’s necessary for our journey to get out of debt as quickly as possible. Don’t feel like you have to go vegan straight from an all McDonald’s diet.

Wade into it with these foundational practices and build your thriftiness over time. Make the commitment and I promise you will reap the rewards, and they will be sweet comfy industrial style brown leather rewards.

1. Read

Or listen to Dave Ramsey’s book The Total Money Makeover. Regardless of what you think about Dave’s philosophies the man has the market nailed on the psychology of spending.

Travis and I read this as part of our premarital counseling and it was a game changer.

I was in way too over my head to figure out where my money should go based on interest, investments, credit scores, etc. I needed a simple plan I could follow and he offered that simplicity. The baby steps are the map we’re using and they do work if you commit to them.

2. Budget

He must be using his favorite budgeting app!

I won’t harp too much on budgets but it’s the most important thing to getting out of debt and winning with money. None of these good intentioned suggestions are worth anything without a plan for telling your money where to go.

If budget sounds too negative you can refer to it as something else, like a Monthly Cash Flow Plan. It doesn’t matter what you call it just make one and stick to it.

You won’t be perfect and you’ll never have the perfect budget so make it as easy as possible for yourself by downloading an app like Mint to track card purchases in real time or EveryDollar if you’re a cash-only spender.

3. Buy Secondhand

You know how I feel about the amazing wallet and environmental benefits of buying clothes secondhand, but we buy just about everything else used as well. I love ThredUp for clothes and we’re avid pawn shop browsers. They’re always willing to negotiate on price. We recently got a $100 indestructible Bluetooth speaker for $30!

We got all our furniture from Craigslist and OfferUp and we browse Goodwill whenever we have free time to see what goodies they have.

We even do it with food. My mom works in cafeterias and catering and will offer us leftovers whenever they’re available. This obviously isn’t an option for everyone but if you know someone with extra food don’t be shy to ask and offer to pick it up on site. It prevents waste and cuts down your grocery bill.

4. Eat at Home

me in the kitchen.

We have a $50 grocery budget per week and we live very comfortably off that. I plan my meals, make a strict grocery list, and we switched to shopping at Aldi.

We budget ourselves a few meals per month to eat out with friends. We hate to pay full price anywhere so a few places we use to save on food include:

  • Sites like Restaurant.com for dining deals.
  • Groupon and LivingSocial for deals on dining and activities.
  • Apps like ibotta and Checkout51 to save at grocery stores and other big box retailers.
  • Mystery shops at bars and restaurants.
  • Shopping through Rakuten when grocery shopping online. (I also never get a Groupon without getting Ebates cash back!)

Spoiler alert: It’s much easier to get to know people at home over a crockpot dinner and a bottle of wine than a crowded restaurant with a live band. Married or single, eating at home is not as time-consuming and boring as I thought it’d be.

These are just a few of the money saving tactics we used. I actually have a list of 200 frugal living tips to spark your imagination on how to live a more frugal life!

5. Side Hustle

Sometimes there’s just nothing left to squeeze out of the budget to pay down debt. The quickest way out of debt is increasing your income. I know that it seems impossible to squeeze more into your already busy life and it is no picnic, it’s exhausting.

But the more you make now, the quicker you go from rice and beans to steak dinners (I’m vegetarian though so I’ll stick with the beans.)

I don’t recommend minimum wage soul-sucking side jobs (unless it’s over the holidays when you can make bank) I mean hustles. Drive Uber during peak hours, deliver pizzas on nights and weekends and rent your house/room out on Airbnb.

Use the talents you already have to freelance some work (try Facebook or fiverr to advertise.) Bringing in an extra $1000 a month now will change the rest of your life.

They paid of $45K of debt in 11 months! Holy wow! Me next please!

They paid of $45K of debt in 11 months! Holy wow! Me next please!

<img data-attachment-id="4826" data-permalink="https://www.modernfrugality.com/paid-off-45000-debt-11-months/mf-how-this-family-paid-off-45000-in-11-months-on-average-incomes/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/MF-How-This-Family-Paid-off-45000-in-11-Months-on-Average-Incomes.jpg?fit=600%2C900&ssl=1" data-orig-size="600,900" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"1"}" data-image-title="Want to pay off debt quickly?" data-image-description="

If you want to pay off your debt quickly, read this. This family paid off over $45,000 in just under 11 months and show you how to do it in your life. #payingoffdebtquickly #payingoffdebtfast #payingoffatonofdebt #payingoffstudentloandebt

” data-medium-file=”https://i0.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/MF-How-This-Family-Paid-off-45000-in-11-Months-on-Average-Incomes.jpg?fit=200%2C300&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i0.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/MF-How-This-Family-Paid-off-45000-in-11-Months-on-Average-Incomes.jpg?fit=400%2C600&ssl=1″ loading=”lazy” width=”400″ height=”600″ data-pin-title=”Want to pay off debt quickly?” data-pin-description=”If you want to pay off your debt quickly, read this. This family paid off over $45,000 in just under 11 months and show you how to do it in your life. #payingoffdebtquickly #payingoffdebtfast #payingoffatonofdebt #payingoffstudentloandebt” src=”https://bariatrx.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/how-we-paid-off-over-45k-of-debt-in-11-months.jpg” alt class=”wp-image-4826″ srcset=”https://bariatrx.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/how-we-paid-off-over-45k-of-debt-in-11-months.jpg 400w, https://i0.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/MF-How-This-Family-Paid-off-45000-in-11-Months-on-Average-Incomes.jpg?resize=200%2C300&ssl=1 200w, https://i0.wp.com/www.modernfrugality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/MF-How-This-Family-Paid-off-45000-in-11-Months-on-Average-Incomes.jpg?w=600&ssl=1 600w” sizes=”(max-width: 400px) 100vw, 400px” data-recalc-dims=”1″>

Jen Smith is a personal finance expert, founder of Modern Frugality and co-host of the Frugal Friends Podcast. Her work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Lifehacker, Money Magazine, U.S. News and World Report, Business Insider, and more. She’s passionate about helping people gain control of their spending.

Source: modernfrugality.com

The Repercussions Of A Temporary Income Drop And Ways To Minimize The Damage

Many of us suffer from a temporary income drop at one point or another.

What we don’t consider is how long it may take to bounce back from such a situation.  Consider these two cases:

income-drop-options

income-drop-options

Quick Navigation

cut the things that can be cut like magazine subscriptions, cable tv, meals out, extracurricular activities, etc.  You can always reinstate these when your income improves.

Avoid Credit.  As much as possible, try to avoid using credit.  Debt will just make recovering from your low income that much harder.  Try to find other, more creative ways to do things that don’t cost as much money.

When your income rebounds, keep living like you did when you were on a low income.  That will help you improve your situation that much faster.

Have you faced a temporary income drop before?  How did you handle it?  What smart steps did you take?  Did you find it took much longer to recover from the income drop than you had expected?

Source: biblemoneymatters.com

The Best Bill Negotiation Services: Bill Shark Vs BillCutterz Vs Truebill Vs BillFixers Vs Trim Vs Bill Advisor

Looking to lower your monthly costs? These bill negotiation services can help you to save hundreds of dollars on your recurring monthly bills.

The post The Best Bill Negotiation Services: Bill Shark Vs BillCutterz Vs Truebill Vs BillFixers Vs Trim Vs Bill Advisor appeared first on Bible Money Matters and was written by Peter Anderson. Copyright © Bible Money Matters – please visit biblemoneymatters.com for more great content.

Source: biblemoneymatters.com