The Power of Baby Steps

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Today’s simple graphics will enlighten you on the power of baby steps and the potency of small repeated marginal gains.

A Baby’s Growth

It’s easy to overlook the rapid growth that humans undergo.

At first, we’re a helpless whiny lump that’s capable of only three things: eat, sleep, bathroom. This baby, one might assume, must have a pretty low ceiling.

Fast forward two full years and…ok, some progress has happened. Our baby is now zooming around of her feet, and she’s babbling, and she’s feeding herself, albeit poorly. These are some true baby steps. Small progress. But this is largely still a helpless child.

Walking Baby GIFs | Tenor

By age five, she’s talking. That’s cool. She can eat food without spilling, she can read (whoa!), and she can run around. Compared to an adult, she’s small and weak and dumb (sorry, it’s true!). But there’s been fantastic progress.

I won’t go much further. We know that brains and bodies continue to grow into adulthood. And we know that adult humans are capable of amazing accomplishments. But the path from helpless whiny lump to amazing adult—that path was walked one baby step at a time.

Let’s bring back Wallace

Remember Wallace from “The Best Time to Invest?”

He’s back, and he’s trying to improve himself via a similar baby step method. What’s he improving?

It could be anything, financial or otherwise. Perhaps Wallace wants a fully funded emergency fund. He wants to eat a healthier diet. Or maybe he wants to be a better writer.

I’m going to refer to these improvements as levels. Wallace is at Level 1 right now. He’s a whiny helpless lump, but he’s looking to grow.

Wallace is going to focus on building towards his goals using a simple 1% improvement every week. Whatever the goal, whatever the skill. Wallace’s wants to take baby steps of 1% improvement each week.

Wallace’s will improve from 1.00 to 1.01 in Week 1.

And then he’ll improve from 1.01 to 1.021 in Week 2.

Slowly but surely, Wallace will progress. His level will improve.

But baby steps are slow

Baby steps are slow. And that’s why baby step improvements can be frustrating (at least for adults—not so much for babies). Take a look at Wallace’s first year of progress. It’s that little blue streak at the bottom of the plot.

baby step year 1
After one year, Wallace has grown from 1.0 to 1.7

Whether he’s saving money or writing a blog or improving at chess, Wallace has barely made any progress (at least, based on my chosen Y-axis).

But Wallace is a grinder. He believes in the power of baby steps. So he continues to focus on weekly 1% improvements for two more years.

baby step year 3
After three years, Wallace is at Level 4.7

Ok! At least Wallace’s growth is no longer looking like a flat line. Let’s fast forward another couple years.

baby step year 5
After five years, Wallace is at Level 13.3

Wallace hits the curve

After five years, it’s apparent that Wallace is starting to “hit the curve.” His 1% improvements no longer look like a straight line. Instead, those improvements are building on one another in a compounding manner.

When he started, Wallace was at “Level 1.” His 1% improvement was tiny—1% of 1 is 0.01. But after hundreds of 1% improvements, he’s now around Level 13. The 1% improvements now increase his level by 0.13 each week. In ~6 weeks of Year 5, Wallace grows more than he did the entire Year 1.

All styles of exponential growth exhibit this behavior. Growth compounds on growth. The early steps feel slow, barely making progress. The last steps feel monumental. But those monumental steps wouldn’t have been possible without the years of slow progress beforehand.

Many 4-year olds can’t read, but many 9-year olds can read chapter books. Five years of consistent practice can bring a sea change of improvement.

It’s just like the parable of rice filling up a chessboard.

baby step year 10
After ten years, Wallace is at Level 177

The curve continues to steepen through Year 10. Now at level 177, the idea of being at level 1 is a distant memory for Wallace. It’s just like the idea that “a lot can change in ten years.”

But are baby steps always possible?

I’ve shown you an assumed scenario where Wallace is always able to make 1% improvements. And maybe that’s too ambitious of an assumption.

Even if Wallace hits the top of his game—like Lebron, Adele, or Meryl Streep—he will probably hit some sort of plateau. You can’t necessarily get better forever. But the goal doesn’t need to be infinite growth. Instead, the goal is to find an effective mindset to achieve growth. And that’s what the baby step method provides.

A widely shared story of baby steps involves coach Dave Brailsford’s leadership of the British Cycling team.

Have a Laugh with the 20 Best Cycling GIFs! - We Love Cycling magazine

Brailsford’s vision expanded beyond training and racing and physical attributes. Instead, Brailsford wanted to improve every aspect of a cyclist’s life—diet, sleep, even relationships. Of course, it included their training and recovery and equipment, too. Brailsford was thinking about baby steps. If he could find 70 different places to make a 1% improvement, the cyclists would end up 100% better (1.01 ^ 70 = 2). Sounds easy, right?

They bought more comfortable pillows to help the cyclists sleep through the night. They cut out refined foods, replacing them with something nutritious. The team considered every component on the bicycle where mass could be reduced, even if only by a gram.

These small improvements worked wonders.

Under Brailsford’s leadership from 2007 to 2017, British cyclists won 5 Tour de France titles. And they won 66 Olympic or Paralympic gold medals. Oh, and they won 178 world championships. British cycling dominated the world cycling scene.

Baby steps work.

Baby steps in personal finance

There are plenty of opinions about simple financial goals that you can add to your baby step to-do list.

Unburying yourself—from debt, from bad habits, etc.—isn’t a one step process. It takes time. And it requires small improvements. You know—baby steps.

You can earn money in bits and pieces. A little raise here, a side hustle there. You can find odd jobs or use smartphone apps that pay you money. Little baby steps all over.

College loans and mortgages can take decades to repay. Learning a new budgeting system requires patience. The math behind interest rates might take a few attempts to understand. Rome wasn’t built in a day. And your personal finance success will take time too. But it’ll come if you stick with it.

This plot shows the small baby steps I’ve made over the past two years. In blue are my slow and steady investments. In red is my slow and steady debt payoff. And the white circles combine the two to show a steady increase in net worth.

Winning the lottery would be cool. So would investing in next Amazon, Apple, etc. while they’re still a startup. But if I don’t get that lucky, I’ll be ok. My baby steps are slowly building up.

Keep on Growing

Take it away, Clapton!

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And, as always, thanks for reading the Best Interest. If you enjoyed this article and want to read more, I’d suggest checking out my Archive or Subscribing to get future articles emailed to your inbox.

And thank you to Feedspot for including me in their Top 100 personal finance blogs. What an honor! Gotta keep on growing…

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Source: bestinterest.blog

How to Get a Personal Loan (Application, Approval, Alternatives)

  • Personal Loans

Personal loans are typically unsecured loans offering up to $50,000 with a term of up to 5 years. They come in several shapes and sizes and interest rates, fees, and terms can differ greatly, but the average personal loan in the United States is between $7,000 and $8,000 and charged at a rate of 11% and 12%.

Get approved fast for a Personal Loan!

Compare multiple loan options from the nation’s top lenders.

Attention: Still Open During the Financial Crisis…

Tip: Apply now to see if you qualify for a personal loan today!

Steps to Getting a Personal Loan

  1. Check Your Credit Report
  2. Compare Rates and Terms
  3. Get a Pre-Qualification
  4. Look at the Fine Print
  5. Look at Alternative Options
  6. Receive Final Approval

1. Check Your Credit Report

The better your credit score is, the lower the interest rate of the loan will be. You can get a free credit check from all three of the main credit bureaus (TransUnion, Experian, Equifax) once a year and use this to see what the lenders will see.

Your credit report will show your credit history in intricate detail, as well as your personal details and all active accounts. If your credit score is below 600, you’ll likely be refused a personal loan; if it’s lower than 700, you may succeed, but won’t necessarily get the best rate.

In any case, it always helps to build your credit score and it’s also very easy to do. If you follow the steps below, you may see a sizeable improvement in a few short months:

  • Increase Credit Limits: Your credit utilization ratio calculates your debt in relation to your credit limits. Someone with a debt of $100,000 is not necessarily worse off than someone with debt of $10,000 if the former has a credit limit of $2 million and the latter has a credit limit of $20,000. By judging debt in this way, your credit score builds an accurate and relative picture of your financial situation. By increasing your credit limits, you can improve this part of your credit score in one quick move.
  • Payoff Debt: Debt is the other half of the credit utilization ratio and works just as well as increasing your credit limit. If you have a debt of $5,000 and a credit limit of $10,000, your credit utilization is a high 50%. If you repay just $1,000 and increase your credit limit by $1,000, this ratio drops to a respectable 36%.
  • Get a Secured Credit Card: A secured credit card uses a security deposit as collateral, allowing you to sign-up even if you have very bad credit or no credit at all. It can build your credit in as little as 6 months as all payments are reported to the credit bureaus. Your deposit will set your credit limit and is completely refundable.
  • Stop Applying: Every time you apply for a new auto loan, personal loan, credit card or mortgage, you receive a hard credit inquiry, which can reduce your FICO credit score by between 2 and 5 points. What’s more, every new account will reduce your score even more and make it harder to quickly build a strong score. Keep applications to a minimum and only apply when you absolutely need a new account.
  • Keep Making Payments: Your payment history accounts for 35% of your FICO credit score, which is more than anything else. It takes a long time to build your score this way, but as soon as you miss a payment, your score can drop by over 100 points and undo all your hard work, while making your task considerably harder.

At the same time, however, your credit score is not the only thing that matters. There is a misconception here, one that claims you can get pretty much anything you want as long as you have an excellent credit card. But that’s simply not the case.

If you are self-employed with an inconsistent income that never goes higher than $15,000 a year, it’s still possible to have an excellent credit score. After all, as long as you keep credit applications to a minimum, meet your payment obligations on time and keep a strong credit utilization ratio, you can build a great credit score.

But does that mean you’ll be offered a $200,000 mortgage or a $50,000 personal loan? Of course not. You’re not making enough money to cover those debts. You might be offered a low limit credit card with relative ease, but you’ll struggle to get a sizeable personal loan and may be refused outright.

2. Compare Rates and Terms

An estimated rate is, as the name suggests, just an estimate. It can vary greatly depending on your credit score, income, and a few other factors. However, your eventual rate will always fall into the estimated range and by looking for the best ranges and comparing the most likely rate based on your current credit score, you can avoid wasting your time on high interest loans.

Many borrowers will look for the lender they are most familiar with, including the ones they have a bank account or mortgage with. But your checking account is irrelevant here and by skipping the comparison shopping you could end up with a much higher rate than you can afford.

Look for the cheapest rates and compare these to the best loan amounts. Calculate how much you will need and whether or not you can sacrifice a few dollars here and there to save more on interest. 

3. Get a Pre-Qualification

A pre-qualification will give you an idea of what sort of loan you can get based on your credit score and income. You can then use this information to compare and contrast, ensuring you find the best and most suitable loan for you.

You will need to supply all of the following information, and this will be used to determine if you’re a good fit or not:

  • Your Social Security Number
  • Your full income and debts (debt-to-income ratio)
  • Your date of birth, home address, phone number, and email
  • All your previous addresses dating back a fixed number of years
  • Details of your education

If your income is too low, your debt-to-income ratio is too high, your credit score is poor or you have made too many credit applications, you may be refused a pre-qualification.

4. Look at the Fine Print

Does the loan have a prepayment penalty? Does it charge high fees and penalty rates? Is there an origination fee? This information may not be included on the main offer page, but it’s essential for determining the worth of a loan, so dig around in the terms and conditions, and make sure you’re getting the best loan possible in terms of the lowest rate as well as the lowest fees.

5. Look at Alternative Options

A personal loan is not the only option at your disposal, and it may not even be the best one. Depending on what you need the money for, there are a host of better alternatives out there, ones that may be more forgiving of your credit score and more willing to give you a large sum and a low rate.

It’s not all about banks. There are online lenders, credit unions, and a host of other financial institutions willing to help you out.

We have outlined some of the best alternative options a little further down this article.

6. Receive Final Approval

Once you have browsed multiple loan offers, checked loan rates, and decided on the best option for you, it’s time to apply and get final approval. You will need to provide some additional info, including W-2 forms and pay stubs, and then the lender will check your credit score and you’ll receive a hit of between 2 and 5 points.

If there are no issues, the loan will be finalized. Some online lenders offer to pay your funds by the next business day and other lenders offer instant payment on acceptance of the loan application. However, many will pay within 1 week.

What are Personal Loans Used For?

You can use a personal loan for a variety of reasons and in most cases, the lender doesn’t care which one you choose. As long as you meet the monthly payments and have a respectable credit score, they don’t care if you’re blowing it on a vacation or launching a business. Here are a few reasons to apply for a personal loan, some of which make more sense than others.

Debt Consolidation

If you have a lot of credit card debt, you can use an unsecured personal loan to clear it. You’ll still have debt, as you’re essentially swapping one debt for another, but you may be charged a lower interest rate or smaller monthly payment.

There are debt consolidation and debt management companies that specialize in this service and can do all the hard work for you. However, these companies focus mainly on reducing your monthly payment and interest rate in exchange for a prolonged-term. You’ll pay less per month and may have an APR that is several points lower, but the increased term means you will pay much more over the length of the loan.

If you have a strong credit score, are in a good financial position and have several high interest credit card debts, you can get a low rate, short-term loan. You’ll pay more per month, but over the term, you could save thousands of dollars in interest payments.

Vacation

It’s rarely a good idea to accumulate debt just so you can enjoy the vacation of a lifetime. But what if it’s the only chance you have of taking that vacation? What if it would be a life goal realized and you’re confident that you can make the monthly payments and eventually clear the debt?

In such cases, while we would never recommend it, using a personal loan for a vacation is understandable. It’s something that many older married couples do to pay for cruises and trips across Europe. It’s also a method used by young married couples to have the honeymoon they have always dreamed of.

College Education

Student loans aren’t always readily available, nor are they the best option. And while they are usually more preferable to personal loans, they may not provide the coverage that you or your grandchildren need.

In the last decade or so, there has been an over 1,000% increase in the number of senior student loan borrowers. This isn’t the result of an influx of mature learners, but rather it’s because they are assuming debts on behalf of their grandchildren and children, co-signing to help them through college.

Pay for a Major Expense

Life can throw several major and unexpected expenses your way, and if you don’t have any money in your savings, a personal loan may be your only option. Many couples live their lives relatively debt and problem-free until one of the following expenses raises its head and they opt for a personal loan.

  • Marriage: A marriage is not something that happens unexpectedly, unless you’re a parent and your child is the one getting married. In either case, it’s a massive expense that can cripple you financially, with the average wedding costing over $30,000.
  • Adoption: The average cost of adoption in the United States ranges from between $40,000 and $50,000. Like a wedding, it’s not necessarily something that happens unexpectedly, but also like a wedding, when the time is right and the need is there, it’s something you feel like you have to do.
  • Funeral: Funerals can cost upwards of $10,000 and often occur out of the blue. If the deceased is insured or has assets, it’s not a problem, but there are countless people who are not insured, don’t have assets, and die unexpectedly. If you’re the closest person to them, you may find yourself assuming responsibility for their funeral.
  • Medical Services: If you fall ill and need a specific type of treatment or surgery that your insurance won’t cover, a personal loan could be the only option. Medical treatments are very expensive, and many Americans simply can’t afford to cover these costs out of their own pockets.

Launch a Business

Launching a business is another risky way to use a personal loan, but one that many borrowers are submitting to every year. This is the golden age of entrepreneurs, and there has never been a better time to launch a business.

Of course, grants and business loans are also available, but the former often requires you to work in specific niches and abide by specific terms, while the latter will be weighed against your personal finances if your business is small or new. A personal loan, therefore, may be the only option for business owners seeking to launch a new project.

Alternative Options to Personal Loans

A personal loan isn’t your only option when you need a little cash. You can borrow money through several different avenues, and the best option for you will depend on what you’re using the money for:

Credit Building

You need credit to build credit; you need a credit card or a loan before you can get the FICO score you need to get a credit card or a loan. It can feel like a Catch-22 situation, but it’s not as complicated as it might initially appear.

If you have no credit or bad credit, you may be offered a super high interest rate loan or credit card and that can help you to build a respectable score. However, it’s a risky way to do it and there are many better options out there if your only goal is to build credit.

For loans, you can use something known as a credit builder loan. Much like a reverse loan, a credit builder loan requires you to complete many of the same steps as a traditional loan, only the lender keeps the lump sum amount and moves it to a secured account. 

That loan payment earns you a small rate of interest and this helps to offset some of the interest you pay the lender. Every month, you make a payment on the loan, paying some of the principal in addition to the monthly interest, and the lender will report your payments to the three major credit bureaus (TransUnion, Experian, Equifax).

Every month, your score will improve slightly as your payment history receives a boost and then, at the end of the term, they’ll release the lump sum to you, and you’ll get most of your money back (minus the interest) in addition to the credit score boost.

Paying Off Debt

A personal loan is a great way to clear debt, but it’s not necessarily the best option. If you’re struggling to meet your monthly payment obligations, it’s not the right option at all, as your monthly payments will increase as your term decreases.

Instead, you can look into the following options:

  • Debt Payoff: Sometimes, simple debt payoff strategies like the Debt Avalanche and the Debt Snowball are enough to clear your debt and can do so in a way that won’t cost you dearly or damage your credit score.
  • Debt Settlement: One of the best and cheapest ways to clear credit card debts, debt settlement works by agreeing reduced settlement amounts with your creditors.
  • Debt Management: A form of debt consolidation performed by a specialist credit counselor. You will pay less every month and can receive greatly improved terms.

Launching a Business

Once you’ve cut costs, reduced expenses, and considered all possible ways to reduce your initial outlay for a business launch, then it might be time to consider crowdfunding. Sites like Kickstarter can help you to get the funds you need and if you have a good idea or product, along with perks, it can give you capital.

You can also sell shares in your business to friends and family, or simply ask them for a small loan.

Expanding a Business

One of the best loan options for expanding your business is something known as PayPal Working Capital, a program that we have touched upon and praised several times before. If you accept PayPal for your business and have processed many payments through your PayPal account, you’ll be offered a lump sum to help you grow.

The loan amount you’re offered will depend on how much money you receive every month. As for the repayment term, you need to pay 10% of the total every 90 days, and all payments are taken as a percentage of your income. If you opt for $20,000, you may pay a fee of $2,000, taking the total to $22,000, and be asked to pay $2,200 every 90 days for a 20% cut.

This means that for every $1,000 you earn, you’ll pay $200 back to your PayPal Working Capital loan, in addition to the usual PayPal fees. The application process is quick and easy, and you can have the money in your PayPal account in just a few minutes.

Paying for Education

While a personal loan can be a useful option when paying for your education or a family member’s education, student loans often provide better rates and loan terms. They can also cover most of the costs associated with college, although if you need extra money for living costs, then a personal loan can be considered.

Paying for Vacations or Other Expenses

If you are a homeowner and have built substantial equity in your home, then a home equity loan or home equity line of credit may provide you with better loan terms and a much higher loan amount. 

A home equity loan or line of credit is a secured loan, as it uses your home as collateral. If you fail to make the payments every month and eventually default on your loan, the lender can simply take your asset and use it to recover the costs of the loan. 

As a result, the annual percentage rate is often much lower. You will still need good credit and a respectable debt-to-income ratio to apply, but the best home equity loan is typically much more favorable and cheaper than the best personal loan.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Mvelopes Review: Digitize the Cash Envelope Method With This App

The cash envelope budgeting method can be a very effective way to control your spending.

The premise is simple. You come up with spending limits for your variable expenses, like groceries, eating out or entertainment. Next, you fill up envelopes with cash to match what you’ve budgeted for each category.

As you shop throughout the month, you can only spend the amount of money in your envelopes. Once you’ve run out of cash, you’ve got to freeze spending until it’s time to fill the envelopes again.

There’s one significant flaw in this budgeting method though: What if you don’t shop with cash? Many people opt for online shopping or use a debit or credit card rather than dollars and coins.

Fortunately, there are ways to adapt the cash envelope budget for cashless shoppers. One of the solutions is to use a budgeting app, like Mvelopes.

In this Mvelopes review, we’ll explain how this app works to help you keep your spending in check.

What Is Mvelopes?

Mvelopes is a budgeting app from Finicity, a fintech company owned by Mastercard. It’s based on the cash envelope system, so all of the categories you set up in your budget are essentially your digital envelopes.

Mvelopes syncs to your financial accounts, so whenever you pay a bill, shop online or swipe your debit card, that transaction shows up in the app. The app uses bank-level encryption to keep your information safe.

Once you assign the transaction to its appropriate envelope, you’ll automatically see how much money you have left to spend in that category. And if you do happen to use cash for something, you can manually enter that info in the app.

How to Get Started with Mvelopes

You can download the Mvelopes app for your Apple or Android mobile device — or you can create an account and manage your money straight from your computer.

Mvelopes offers three tiers of service. Mvelopes Basic costs $5.97 per month or $69 per year and lets you set up your budget by syncing to all your financial accounts. The next step up is Mvelopes Premier, which costs $9.97 per month or $99 per year and includes access to the Mvelopes Learning Center and Debt Reduction Center.

The Mvelopes Learning Center has online video lessons on topics like mastering your spending, creating an emergency fund, insuring your future, home buying and how to have stress-free holidays. With the Debt Reduction Center, you get support to create a tailor-made debt payoff plan.

The app’s top tier of service is Mvelopes Plus. This plan connects you with a real-live personal finance trainer for one-on-one virtual sessions four times a year. You’ll also get higher priority customer service support. Mvelopes Plus costs $19.97 a month or $199 a year.

Although there is no free version of Mvelopes, you can sign up for a 30-day free trial of Mvelopes Premier — the app’s most popular option — to test out the service with no financial commitment.

The Pros and Cons of Mvelopes

Mvelopes can sync with over 16,000 financial institutions, so most users can track their spending with minimal effort. Keeping your spending in check means you can free up more money to go toward saving or debt.

According to the company, Mvelopes has helped users save an average of $6,175 and pay off an average of $17,425 of debt.

One disadvantage of this app, however, is that it’s not free, like the budgeting apps Mint or Clarity Money. Also, if you’re looking for a tool that tracks more aspects of your financial life, such as your net worth and where you stand with your investments, you might want to consider an app like Personal Capital.

Who Is Mvelopes For?

The Mvelopes app is a great option for fans of the cash envelope method who are looking to digitize their money management.

It is also a good choice for people looking to nix overspending, because the app keeps you up-to-date with how much funds you have left to spend in each budget category.

Additionally, Mvelopes can help you boost your personal finance knowledge via online courses or pay down debt with a tailored payoff plan.

By signing up for the free 30-day trial, you’ll have a month to decide whether Mvelopes is the right choice for you.

Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

The No-Cash Envelope System That Works

I am a strong believer in the cash envelope system. It works great for our family. But I also know that is not the case for everyone.  You may not want to use cash but love the envelope system concept.  Fortunately, there is a program you can use that marries your desire to use plastic with the discipline of a cash envelope budget.

When it comes to managing your money, spending and trying to get out of debt, there are many programs and apps out there. But, not all of them can do everything.  That means one app for your budget, another for trying to get out of debt and then yet another for managing your spending.

ProActive does it all.  You can manage your money, spending, budgeting, and debt payoff – all from one simple to manage app! But, before you jump in and download it, make sure you read this honest review.  That way, you’ll know what to expect!

What is ProActive?

ProActive combines the beauty of shopping with plastic and the discipline of cash envelopes.  The system ensures that you never overspend – ever!  Just like with cash, when the envelope is empty, you are done shopping!

What is the cash envelope budget?

A cash envelope budget is what it sounds like. Rather than using plastic to shop you get cash and place the budgeted amounts into envelopes.  For example, if your budget for food is $200 a paycheck, then you get cash and place $200 in an envelope earmarked for groceries.

When you grocery shop, you use only the cash in the envelope. That is all you have available to spend. It is impossible to overspend.  If there is only $20 left then that means you can’t spend $22.  There is not enough money there.

It is a system that works very well for people who want to better manage and control spending.

How does it work?

Once you sign up and create your account, you will get a ProActive branded debit card.  When you are ready to spend, you use the ProActive card.  But, before you can swipe, you have to let the app know which envelope the money needs to come from.  That way, you always stay on budget and don’t spend more than you should.

Add funds to your account

When you get paid, review your budget.  Pay the bills that are due.  What you have left over is what you have left to spend on everything else on your budget.  It will include items such as clothing, household items, personal care and beauty, groceries, entertainment, dues, etc.

You will go into the app and click the “+” icon.  That starts the transfer from your bank account to your ProActive debit card.

Allocate the money to your virtual envelopes

Once the funds are deposited, you have to assign an amount to each category (a.k.a. envelope).  Review the budget to see what you have available to spend.

Shop as usual (but pay with the ProActive card)

You can’t swipe your card until you have told the card which category (or envelope) the money should come from.  Simply open the app and click the spend category.  Then you can swipe.

If there is not enough money left in the category to cover your purchase, it will be declined.  That makes it impossible to overspend.

The smart way to use ProActive

As parents, we teach our kids.  They need to know how to take care of themselves, cook, clean and do other things around the house.  But, it seems that financial responsibility is one that gets overlooked.

One thing that ProActive allows is for you to add your kids and teach them how to manage their own money.  You can put funds on their account and they too can set up categories.  And, just like mom and dad, they have to select the category before they spend so they are not spending more than they should either.

ProActive not only teaches your kids how to use a debit card, but also the financial responsibilities that go along with it.  And, it is in an environment that both mom and dad can see (and control).

Who is ProActive a fit for?

Just like with every other app or budget system there is never a one-size-fits-all system. That means this may not work for you.  If you love your credit card for the rewards then this will not work for you.  You can’t attach a credit card and use this program.

But, if you struggle to try to manage your money and spending then you really need to get this app. It makes it impossible to overspend and helps you learn how to think about every purchase you make.  You may not need to use it forever as you will become disciplined.

What does it cost?

When you sign up, ProActive will give you a 15-day trial.  They want to make sure it is a fit for you before they make you pay.  Then, if you love it, you continue at $5.75 a month (paid annually, so $69).  You can add a second user for $29 a year and even add your kids for just $24 each.

What happens if I forget my phone?

It happens.  We leave our phones behind. In that case, it is important that you always have an alternative payment method handy, such as your bank debit card, credit card or cash.

If your goal is to get out of debt, you have to first start with your budget and spending. If you don’t do that, you will never achieve your goals.  ProActive is one tool that helps you every step of the way.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

3 Ways to Beat Debt Burnout

3 Ways to Beat Debt Burnout – SmartAsset

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Paying off debt with “gazelle intensity” is a great way to get rid of debt quickly. Cutting your budget to a nearly bare-bones level and working hard to increase your income, speed up debt payments and save up for retirement will help you make great progress on your financial goals, but most people can only live on a strict budget for so long before they begin experiencing debt burnout.

Find out now: How much do you need to save for retirement?

What is Debt Burnout?

Burnout is feeling exhausted with your day-to-day routine or the lack of flexibility in your budget. Some people get tired of not having extra money in their food budget to go out to eat occasionally or buy a wider variety of foods at the grocery store. Others grow tired of having little to no budget for entertainment and fun. Burnout leaves you feeling fatigued, frustrated and ready to give up on your debt-free dreams.

Beating Debt Burnout

After you’ve diagnosed yourself with debt burnout, it’s important to take immediate steps to correct it so you don’t end up un-doing all the progress you’ve made toward paying off your debt. The steps to beating burnout don’t have to be drastic. It’s possible to do it by making a few simple adjustments.

1. Reassess Your Budget

After you’ve paid down some of your debt, it’s common to start feeling some burnout from the lack of flexibility in your budget. This may be a good time to reassess your budget and perhaps give yourself a little more money for things you enjoy, like increasing how much you spend on entertainment or giving yourself a little more money for going out to eat with friends and family. This may decrease the amount of money going to debt payments, but that’s better than getting burnt out and going on a crazy credit card shopping spree down the road.

2. Plan a Fun Trip or Event

While your family is paying off debt, it’s common to give up all vacations, trips and fun events. But when you start experiencing debt burnout, planning for one of these events is a great way to stay motivated and give your family something to look forward to. The trip or event doesn’t have to be a huge and expensive ordeal. Even a short day or weekend trip is something to look forward to when you are living on such a tight budget. Try planning for when you hit a milestone – paying off half of your debt or even for when the whole thing is paid off.

3. Find Some Support

When you start to feel burnt out and unmotivated to continue your debt payoff journey, seeking out an accountability partner is a great way to help you stay on track. Single people can especially benefit from having someone to confide in and bounce ideas off of. But even couples and families can use the outside perspective of an accountability partner to help them keep focused on their financial goals and beat debt burnout.

Debt burnout is a real thing that many people struggle with as they work their way out of debt. The more debt you have to begin with and the longer the time frame for paying it off, the more likely it is that you’ll face burnout at some point.

Find out now: Should I get a fixed or adjustable rate mortgage? 

What other ways can you think of to help beat debt burnout?

Photo credit: flickr

Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan is a writer with an expertise in debt, budgeting and saving money. She is focused on paying off her consumer and student loans, while simplifying her life and closet. Kayla’s work has been featured across the web, including on The Huffington Post, Time, credit.com and AOL. You can follow her as she blogs about her journey out of debt at www.kaylasloan.com.
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Source: smartasset.com